Legislative Alerts

NCSBA Legislative Update – June 1, 2018

NCSBA Legislative Update – June 1, 2018

BUDGET
Lawmakers completed their work on the 2018-19 budget this morning, as the House gave final approval to the package by a vote of 66-44.  The Senate voted separately to give final approval to the plan on Thursday morning 36-14 mostly on party lines (one Democrat voted yes).  Because the budget was put into a conference report (SB99), there were several unique features to this year’s budget process- the various spending subcommittees did not meet to take up their sections (there was just one joint meeting of each chamber’s full appropriations committees); each chamber voted separately on the full package (as opposed to the first chamber sending it over to the other chamber); and no amendments were allowed. This allowed for a quick process where the budget was sent to the Governor less than 96 hours after being released.

Each chamber spent multiple hours debating the measure, with most of the Senate debate occurring Wednesday afternoon and most of the House debate occurring Thursday afternoon.  The House debate in particular featured a few tense moments of heated discussion.  You can read more about the debate here and here.

It is unclear what Governor Cooper will do now that the budget is heading his way but he has 10 days to sign, veto, or let it become law without his signature.

Attached please find a review of the major budget provisions for K-12 public education.

MUNICIPAL CHARTER BILL
HB514 passed out of the Senate Education Committee this week.  This bill allows a handful of cities/towns to establish and run charter schools.  When the House passed it last year the bill only gave this authority to the towns of Matthews and Mint Hill.  The Senate Education Committee added the towns of Cornelius and Huntersville to the bill before sending it to the Senate floor.  It passed an initial vote in the Senate Thursday by a vote of 30-20.  Senators Dan Barrett (R-Iredell), Tamara Barringer (R-Wake), Danny Earl Britt (R-Columbus), Tom McInnis (R-Richmond), and Rick Horner (R-Nash) joined all Democrats in opposing the bill.  It will be taken up for a final vote on Monday.  If passed, it would need to go back to the House for a concurrence vote.

NCSBA has significant concerns about this bill.  In conjunction with a provision in the budget (see budget summary attachment), HB514 would create a significant policy shift in the operation and funding of our state’s public schools.  It would set a precedent that impacts students, districts, and communities across the state.

Sec. 38.8 of the budget allows cities to levy property taxes to enter into leasing agreements for real property or mobile classroom units for use as school facilities for public schools.  Currently, cities are not authorized to use property tax revenue for schools.  HB514 then permits the city to operate a public charter school.  Additionally, it has been the policy of this state to bar governmental entities from appropriating taxpayer dollars for capital for charter schools.  This concept has not been properly vetted and has too many potential risks and unintended consequences.

SCHOOL SAFETY LEGISLATION
A comprehensive bill to try to improve school safety passed out of the House K-12 Education Committee Wednesday.  HB938 includes many of the recommendations from the House Select Committee on School Safety.  It is scheduled for a vote in the House today.  HB938 would:

– Require peer-to-peer support programs in all schools with grade 6 and above.

– Mandate that all public school buildings undergo annual facility vulnerability assessments.

– Require each LEA to submit an annual report on SROs.

– Establish training requirements for SROs.

NCSBA LEGISLATIVE WEBINAR   June 4
Registration is open for NCSBA’s next legislative webinar on June 4 at Noon.  During this free webinar we will give an update on the budget and recent legislative activity.  Click here to register for the June 4 webinar.

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Sean Holmes
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

 

Sean HolmesNCSBA Legislative Update – June 1, 2018
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State Budget Released

State Budget Released

The State budget for 2018/19 was released on Monday night. House and Senate spending committees took up the measure this morning and it is expected that votes in the House and Senate will occur on Wednesday and Thursday. Remember that since the budget has been put into a conference report (SB99) it cannot be amended. House and Senate members will have to take an up or down vote on the full package as written. It is probable that a budget technical corrections bill will move through the General Assembly later this session. While it is unclear whether Governor Cooper will sign the budget if it passes, Republicans likely have enough numbers in the General Assembly to override a possible veto.

NCSBA is in the process of analyzing the budget. We will have full details about what is in the budget in our Friday update. For now, here are some brief highlights:

Teacher Salaries
The budget sets a base annual salary of $50,000 for teachers in years 15-24. Then increases the salary to $52,000 from year 25 and on. On average teacher salaries would go up 6.5% under the proposal. The proposal pretty much keeps in place what is already set to go into effect for teacher salaries for 2018/19.  The main difference is that the annual salary for teachers at year 25 and up is increased over what the biennium budget had planned.

Principal Salaries
Principals would see their salaries go up 6.9% on average over 2017/18 levels. No change is made to the new principal salary structure but the base salaries on each of the rungs is increased.  Below is a comparison of the salary levels from last year and the levels proposed for 2018/19.

 

2017/18:

 

Avg. Daily Membership              Base                      Met Growth         Exceeded Growth

0-400                                       $61,751                 $67,926                 $74,101

401-700                                   $64,839                 $71,322                 $77,806

701-1,000                                $67,926                 $74,719                 $81,511

1,001-1,300                             $71,014                 $78,115                 $85,216

1,301+                                     $74,101                 $81,511                 $88,921

 

2018-19:

Avg. Daily Membership              Base                      Met Growth         Exceeded Growth

0-400                                       $66,000                 $72,611                 $79,212

401-700                                   $69,311                $76,242                  $83,173

701-1,000                                $72,611                $79,872                  $87,133

1,001-1,300                             $75,912                $83,503                   $91,094

1,301+                                     $79,212                  $87,133                 $95,054

 

The budget also makes fixes to the principal salary and bonus structure that NCSBA identified.  NCSBA worked with Senator Jerry Tillman and others on this issue since November.  Working with the State Board of Education representative, most of the changes that NCSBA has talked about are included in the budget.  These changes do the following:

  • Include the hold harmless to 2016-17 pay.

 

  • Simplifies how principals receive increases and decreases in pay so that there is less volatility, no pay backs, and less of an administrative burden.  Principals will receive the increase in the schedule on July 1 based on the 2017-18 ADM and 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 performance scores.   January 1 adjustments will be made based on the 2018-19 ADM and 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18 performance scores.  Without this provision adjustments would have to be made twice after scores come out in September and then with ADM in November.  Additionally, this eliminates the need for LEAs to recoup pay if overpayments were made.

 

  • Includes a change to the definition of “demotion” so that principals who move from a higher to a lower salary level are not considered “demoted.”’

 

  • Changes the bonus program so that going forward there will only be one bonus.  The bonus going forward will be the one for the top 50th percentile. Increases are made at each of the rungs except for the bottom rung. Additionally, a principal can earn double the amount if they are in a D or F school. This eliminates the bonus program that was only for principals that had not met/met in year 1 and then exceeded in year 2.

What is not included in the budget but was included in Senator Tillman’s bill is the three-year hold harmless for principals who are paid on the exceed rung of the salary schedule who move to a low performing school.  Thank you for your help locally on communicating with lawmakers and pointing out these concerns.

Other Salaries and Benefits
Money would also be appropriated for a 2% salary increase for noncertified personnel and salary increases for school bus drivers.

Other Provisions

– The budget contains most of the language from HB600, the school leasing bill. This bill would authorize local school boards to enter into arrangements where a third party can build schools and then lease them back to that school board.

 

– Maintains the $4 million in additional cuts to DPI that were in the biennium budget bill last year.

 

– Increases the Needs-Based grants for school construction from $75 million to over $117 million.

 

– Eliminates $18 million in appropriations that were scheduled to go to school technology from the fines and forfeitures fund.

 

– Allows cities to appropriate money to public schools.

 

– Directs $25,000 to a charter school for school construction. This is significant because it would set a precedent for charters accessing school capital.

 

– There is also $28 million in new money for school safety provisions as we noted in our Friday update last week.

 

 

Click here to see the budget bill.

Sean HolmesState Budget Released
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NCSBA Legislative Update – May 25, 2018

NCSBA Legislative Update – May 25, 2018

 



BUDGET TIMELINE
House and Senate leaders have been meeting for weeks on the 2018/19 State budget and plan to have the budget passed by June 1.  The full package is expected to be made public Monday evening.  House and Senate spending committees are scheduled to jointly meet to take up the budget on Tuesday, May 29 at 10AM.  Look for a special update from NCSBA when budget details are released.

As part of budget negotiations, House and Senate leadership have agreed to present a budget that cannot be changed.  Because the budget will be placed in a conference report (for Senate Bill 99), it cannot be amended because legislative rules prohibit amendments to conference reports.  Therefore, each chamber will have a simple up or down vote next week.  If both chambers adopt the SB99 conference report it heads to the Governor.  If it fails lawmakers go back to the negotiating table.

School Safety Budget Provisions
A press conference was held Thursday to announce some one-time school safety grants that will be included in the 2018/19 budget.  The funds are targeted at priority areas identified by the House Select Committee on School Safety during the interim.  Below is a picture tweeted out by Rep. David Lewis highlighting the school safety budget items.

The school safety provisions add up to a total of $35 million but only $28 million is new funding; $7 million can already be found in the budget.  We will provide additional details on these items next week.

For up to the minute updates on budget developments next week, be sure to follow the NCSBA Governmental Relations Department on Twitter at @NCSBAGovtRel!

LOCAL EDUCATION FUNDING DISPUTE BILL APPROVED IN CMTE
A compromise bill to modify the process for resolving local education funding disputes was approved by the Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee on Monday.

The bill, based on a study of the issue by the Program Evaluation Division, would keep the current process of allowing for mediation if a local school board objects to the amount of local education funding appropriated by the county commissioners.  However, if the school board and county commissioners cannot reach an agreement through mediation the bill would eliminate the option for school boards to file a lawsuit and would replace it with a default funding formula. The formula would use the LEA’s student enrollment plus inflation, with funding increasing at a faster pace over three years if an agreement is not reached within the timeframe.  None of the bill language would impact or override existing local funding formulas already in place.  “Both sides are not entirely happy with this bill that’s before you, but they both seem to live with it,” Rep. Craig Horn (R-Union) told the committee.  You can read the recommended bill by clicking here.

A proposed amendment addressing disputes over school construction and facility funding was also discussed.  NCSBA Director of Governmental Relations Leanne Winner spoke against the amendment because “it puts the county commissioners completely in charge of capital without the school boards having any way of addressing health and safety, compliance with federal laws, or overcrowding in our schools.”  The committee decided to NOT take a vote on the amendment.  However, the amendment could reappear later in the process if the bill starts moving through the General Assembly.

Click here to see the full report on the local education funding dispute process published by the Program Evaluation Division.


NOTABLE BILLS THIS WEEK

SB737- Safer Schools, Healthier Kids Act.  This bill is a large package of measures designed to reduce school violence.  Among the provisions in the bill are a few items that were included in the Governor’s budget addressing school safety.  SB737 would provide $25 million to the SBE to enhance school security infrastructure, $40 million for additional school support personnel to help students struggling with mental health challenges (counselors, school nurses, etc.), and $7 million for additional SROs.

SB756- School Security Act of 2018.  This would offer a path for teachers to go through the same training process as SROs and become a “teacher resource officer.” These individuals would have “the same powers as municipal and county police officers to make arrests for both felonies and misdemeanors and to charge for infractions.”  Funding would be set aside for a 5% salary boost for up to 3,000 teachers to go through this process.  The decision as to whether a teacher resource officers could carry firearms would be left to the individual school.  A teacher’s identity as a school resource officer would be confidential.

NCSBA LEGISLATIVE WEBINARS
NCSBA’s legislative webinar for May 28 has been cancelled due to the Memorial Day holiday.  We will resume our weekly free webinar series on Monday, June 4.  Click here to register for the June 4 webinar.

BILLS
Click here for the list of K-12 bills filed this week that NCSBA is tracking.

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Sean Holmes
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Sean HolmesNCSBA Legislative Update – May 25, 2018
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NCSBA Legislative Update – May 18, 2018

NCSBA Legislative Update – May 18, 2018

NCSBA Legislative Update
MAY 18, 2018

 

SESSION BEGINS
Lawmakers returned to Raleigh Wednesday to begin the 2018 legislative “short” session.  The first day of session was accompanied by a rally of roughly 19,000-20,000 teachers and supporters asking for better teacher working conditions, improved teacher pay, and increased investments in public education.  You can find more coverage of the teacher rally by clicking here.

Things are expected to move quickly this session, as the Senate could roll out its version of the budget as early as next week.  The House went right to work moving new legislation on Thursday as they approved HB933, which will have NC accept the nationally certified school psychologist credential for licensure.  This was one of the recommendations of the House Select Committee on School Safety (see below).  Compelling information shared with lawmakers is that there are currently 12 LEAs that don’t have a full-time school psychologist and 75 vacancies.

GOVERNOR’S BUDGET PROPOSAL
Governor Roy Cooper rolled out his budget priorities for the 2018-19 fiscal year on May 10.  His budget invests heavily in K-12 initiatives.  Most notably, Gov. Cooper proposes to put a statewide bond of up to $2 billion for school construction and renovations on the November 2018 ballot.  Getting the General Assembly to allow a statewide school construction bond on the ballot is one of NCSBA’s top priorities for this session.  Learn more about the school bond coalition at www.ncschoolbond.com.

Gov. Cooper’s total State budget is approximately $600 million more than legislative leaders have agreed to budget.  Senate leader Phil Berger called Gov. Cooper’s budget “an unserious attempt to score political points in an election year.”

Below are other highlights of Gov. Cooper’s budget proposal for K-12 public education.

Salary/Retirement Proposals
– $98.7 million for an average 8% salary increase for classroom teachers in 2018-19.  This would be an increase from the 6% average raise teachers are already scheduled to get.  This comes as part of a four-year plan to hike average teacher salaries in NC to the national average by 2021-22.  There would also be a $150 stipend given to teachers at the start of the year to offset the cost of supplies that teachers purchase out of pocket.

– $13 million for principal salaries for 2018-19.  Also reforms the salary schedule so that principals go back to getting step increases based on years of experience, plus a salary supplement based on ADM of the school.  This would roll back the new principal salary model established by the legislature that sets salary based on school growth and ADM.

– The greater of $1,250 or 2% raise for central office and non-certified LEA employees.

– Provides a 1% COLA increase for retirees.

School Safety Investments
– $25 million to the SBE for building updates, equipment, and communications systems to improve security at public schools.

– $40 million for LEAs to hire more student support personnel such as nurses, counselors, psychologists, and social workers.

– $7 million for additional SROs.

– $3 million for the elementary and middle school SRO grant program.

– Additional funding for mental health training to support the mental health needs of students.

School Construction

– Put a bond of up to $2 billion on the November 2018 ballot for construction and renovations of schools.

– $69 million in lottery funds and $6 million from the Indian Gaming Fund to help LEAs build additional classrooms to meet the K-3 class size requirements.

Textbooks/Digital Materials
– $15 million for textbooks and digital materials.

AIG Grant
– $3 million for up to 10 LEAs to expand identification of and opportunities for AIG students.

Professional Development
– $5 million for teacher professional development.

DPI
– Elimination of the additional $4.1 million DPI cut that is set to go into effect in 2018-19.

School Vouchers
– Repeal of the automatic $10 million increase for the school voucher program that is right now written into law.

NC Pre-K
– Directs TANF funds toward creating 1,000 additional prekindergarten slots.

Click here to see the whole budget.


Notable Bills Filed

SB718- Revise Principal Compensation.  This bill was filed in the Senate on Wednesday by Senator Jerry Tillman (R-Randolph).  SB718 would fix some of the issues with the new principal compensation and bonus program that NCSBA has identified.  Specifically, it would:

– Set out January-December as the timeframe in which principal salaries are in effect (instead of July-June).  This allows time for reporting the previous year’s accountability data upon which the principal’s placement on the schedule will be based.

– Extend the hold harmless until 2020.

– Ensure that principals who see a drop in salary due to their school performance are not considered “demoted” under law.  This will ensure that LEAs do not have to supplement that principal’s salary out of local funds.

– Protect high achieving principals who move to a low-performing school so that their salaries don’t drop as they try to turn the school around for 3 years.

– Discontinuing the bonuses that go to principals who move from met or not met growth to exceed growth.  The money is rolled over into a new bonus that goes to principals of a top 50% performing school that is also a D or F school.   There would still be the bonuses for all principals of top 50% schools and those bonus levels would be increased by $1,000 from current levels.  This would get rid of the exceed-exceed/no bonus issue with the current program.

You can click here for the full legislative staff summary.

HB965- National and State Mottos in Schools Act.  This bill would require the display of the NC motto and National motto in at least one prominent place in each public school.  The NC motto is “To Be Rather Than to Seem.”  Since the National motto is “In God We Trust,” this bill could generate religion in school controversy and has already received some media attention.  Click here to read a recent story on this bill.

ED OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE
The committee approved its set of legislative recommendations for the 2018 session on May 1.  All these items could be taken up at any point during the short session.  Here are the notable legislative recommendations:

  1. Extend the virtual charter school pilots for 4 additional years (through 2022-23).
  2. Implement a cross-training program within the Licensure Section of DPI to improve timely processing of educator license applications.
  3. Require SBE/DPI to submit an annual report on LEAs that are complying with the law on cursive writing and memorization of multiplication tables.

Click here to read the entire report of findings and recommendations.

HOUSE SCHOOL SAFETY COMMITTEE
The House Select Committee on School Safety held its final meeting on May 10. The committee approved its report of findings and recommendations.

Eight of the recommendations that impact K-12 had draft legislation attached. Those bills have all been formally introduced in the House and one- HB933- has started moving (see above).

Below are the notable recommendations for K-12 from the report.  The recommendations that have been introduced in bill form have the bill number in parentheses.
Rec 1.  Accept the nationally certified school psychologist credential for licensure in North Carolina (HB933).

Rec 2.  Continue working towards meeting national recommended staffing ratios for school mental health support professionals.

Rec 3.  Establish threat assessment teams in all public schools (HB934).

Rec 4.  Require LEAs to develop peer to peer counseling programs in middle & high schools.

Provide grants for training and materials (HB934).

Rec 6.  Provide funding for apps that allow anonymous reporting on bullying, weapons, potential threats, abuse, suicide and related issues (HB932).

Rec 8.  Study the expansion and requirements of the volunteer SRO program.

Rec 10.  Create training and continuing ed requirements for SROs (HB937).

Rec 11.  Increase the SRO grant by $1.8 million for elementary & middle schools (HB941).

Rec 12.  Require annual vulnerability assessments for each school building (HB939).

Rec 13.  Require local school boards to submit an annual SRO report (HB940).

Rec 14.  Support HB285, which requires most school personnel to be trained in student mental health and suicide prevention.

Click here to see the full report.

2018 PRIMARY
The 2018 primary was held on May 8.  There were 14 incumbents who chose not to run or were defeated.

There were three local school board members who successfully won primaries for General Assembly seats:

– Mr. Raymond Smith of the Wayne County school board won the Democrat primary for NC House District 21 (covering Duplin, Sampson, Wayne), which is being vacated by retiring Rep. Larry Bell.

– Ms. Barbara Yates-Lockamy, a member of the Columbus school board and a former member of the NCSBA Board of Directors, won an uncontested Democrat nomination for House District 46 (covering Bladen, Columbus, Robeson), and will face incumbent Rep. Brenden Jones in November.

– Mr. John Campbell of the Robeson school board won the Democrat primary for Senate District 13 (covering Columbus and Robeson), and will face incumbent Senator Danny Earl Britt in November.

Congratulations to Mr. Smith, Mr. Campbell, and Ms. Yates-Lockamy!

To find a full list of the lawmakers who did not run for reelection, ran for another office, or were defeated in the primary you can access the NCSBA legislative webinar from May 14.  That powerpoint is here and these lists are on slides 14 and 15.

NCSBA LEGISLATIVE WEBINARS
Registration is open for NCSBA’s weekly legislative update webinar on Monday, May 21.  This free webinar, which will be at Noon on Monday, will review the opening days of the legislative session and preview the week ahead.  Click here to register.

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Sean Holmes
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

 

Sean HolmesNCSBA Legislative Update – May 18, 2018
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NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – April 2018

NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – April 2018

NCSBA MONTHLY INTERIM LEGISLATIVE REPORT
APRIL 2018

                         


LEGISLATIVE WEBINAR SERIES

 

NCSBA’s weekly Noon legislative webinar series is ongoing. Our next FREE webinar will be Monday, May 7 and will review NCSBA’s efforts on school safety issues for the 2018 session.  These webinars are free and no CEU is given.  Registration is now open for the May 7 webinar. Click here for that registration link.  The following week on Monday, May 14 there will be a webinar previewing the 2018 session.  We will continue to offer weekly free Monday webinars throughout the legislative session to keep school districts up to date on the latest from Jones St.

You can find the previous legislative webinars and register for future ones at https://www.ncsba.org/governmental-relations/webinars

JOINT LEGISLATIVE EDUCATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE
The General Assembly’s Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee held its sixth meeting of the interim on April 3.  The Committee heard from UNC President Margaret Spellings about the My Future NC Commission.  They also heard a report from the Joint Subcommittee on Medical Education and Medical Residency.

JT. LEGISLATIVE STUDY COMMITTEE ON THE DIVISION OF LOCAL SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS
This committee met on April 4 and April 11.

At the April 4 meeting the committee heard about innovative high school and STEM programs occurring in various school districts and charter schools.  Click here for the presentation materials.

At the April 11 meeting the committee reviewed and approved its final report to the General Assembly.  The report does not recommend breaking up any school districts.  It specifies that current literature and existing studies do not document a relationship between LEA size and student performance.  One of the other recommendations is to alert the House and Senate education appropriations committees of the 60 LEAs whose costs for exceptional children’s services exceed the cap on what an individual LEA can receive for EC funding.  You can read the full report here.

HOUSE SCHOOL SAFETY COMMITTEE
Two subcommittees of the House School Safety Committee met this month.

Student Health Working Group Subcommittee
This subcommittee met on April 9.  The subcommittee heard the following presentations:

– An update on the NC School Counselor Association
Materials: Click here

– An update on the NC School Psychology Association
Materials: Click here

– Current Needs and Licensure Reciprocity for School Psychologists
Materials: Click here

– Recommended Programs on School-Based Mental Health
Materials: Click here
Materials: Click here

 

The subcommittee met again on April 23 and heard a few more presentations and approved a set of recommendations to the full School Safety Committee.  The recommendations include creating threat assessment teams in schools and peer counseling programs in middle schools and high schools as well as exploring tools that allow for anonymous student reporting of suspicious behavior.  There is also a recommendation dealing with credentialing school psychologists to ease recruitment.  You can find all the findings and recommendations by clicking here.  You can see the presentations from the April 23 meeting here.

You can read more about the April 23 meeting by clicking here.

Student Physical Safety and Security Working Group
This subcommittee met on April 17.  They heard from the executive director of the NC Christian Schools Association, a member of the Governor’s Task Force on Safer Schools and a representative from the NC Center for Safer Schools.  They also heard from two county sheriffs.

In addition, Governor Roy Cooper this month announced that his budget proposal will include $130 million for school facility upgrades, school resource officers, mental health programs, school emergency planning and school nurses and counselors.  You can read more about that here.

JT. LEGISLATIVE TASK FORCE ON EDUCATION FINANCE REFORM
This Task Force met on April 25.  A presentation was given that examined the “weighted-student” funding formula for education and how states are using variations of that model.  You can read more coverage about the meeting here.  You can see the presentation materials here.

JOINT LEGISLATIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE
This Committee met on April 12 to approve its draft findings and recommendations to the General Assembly.  Among the recommendations are for the legislature to consider ways that schools can increase the number of persons present at each school to perform security-related functions.  Another recommendation is to have State officials evaluate and recommend what changes can be made to school construction requirements to make them safer from man-made threats.

JT LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM EVALUATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE 
Local Funding Dispute Resolution- The Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee met on April 9.  At this meeting the committee signed off on a draft bill modifying the dispute resolution and litigation process between school boards and county commissioners concerning local education funding levels.  The draft bill would continue allowing school boards to ask for an independent arbiter to look at the local funding dispute dispute and try to negotiate a funding level.  If the mediator cannot come to any settlement, the draft bill would establish a default funding formula that would determine what the local funding level should be.  This would replace the option for the school board to take legal action on local funding.  The draft bill would be eligible for consideration this session.  Click here for the draft bill.  Read the study of the local school dispute mediation process here.

Lottery- The committee also signed off on draft legislation with initiatives to increase lottery revenues.  Click here for the draft bill.

School Nurses- The Committee reviewed a report on increasing student nurses in public schools.  It found that it could cost as much as $79 million to get a nurse in every public school.  You can read the report here and a news story about the report here.

Principal Prep- The Committee also reviewed a report on improving the Transforming Principal Prep program.  That report is here.

JT. LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ON GENERAL GOVT
This Committee met on April 10, 2018.  Among the presentations given at this meeting was a follow up on the 234 seized vehicles that were unaccounted for in an audit last year.  State investigators located nearly all the 234 vehicles.  You can read more here.

GOVERNOR’S LEANDRO COMMISSION
This Governor’s Commission on Access to a Sound Basic Education met on April 10 in Greensboro.  DPI’s CFO Adam Levison gave a detailed analysis of NC’s allotment system for distributing funding to public schools.  The Commission also heard from a panel of school finance officers about what they feel are the strengths and weaknesses of the current allotment system.  During the afternoon portion of this meeting, the Commission moved worked with a representative from the organization that has been selected to serve as an independent court advisor on the Leandro litigation.  This organization is WestEd.  You can read more coverage of this meeting here.

  

 

 

 

 

 

Sean HolmesNCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – April 2018
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NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – March 2018

NCSBA MONTHLY INTERIM LEGISLATIVE REPORT
MARCH 2018

                         





Legislative Webinar Series 
Join us for the Let’s Break to Educate legislative webinar series. Starting April 16, these weekly Monday webinars will offer an opportunity to receive updates on the priority issues NCSBA will be focusing on for the 2018 legislative session. The cost to participate is free and there will be no CEU credits. Participants will get a chance to hear about NCSBA’s priority issues for 2018 and ask questions of staff. On April 16 we will focus on our efforts on the NC school bond and that will be followed by webinars on school calendar, principal pay and bonuses, school safety and a preview of the 2018 session. All webinars will start at Noon and last no more than 45 minutes. Registration is now open for the April 16 webinar. Click here for that registration link.

The other webinars will be at Noon on April 23, 30, May 7, May 14. Check www.ncsbac.org for ongoing updates on the webinar schedule.

 

JOINT LEGISLATIVE EDUCATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE
The General Assembly’s Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee held its fifth meeting of the interim on March 6.

Innovative School District
Dr. Eric Hall, Superintendent of the Innovative School District, reported on the status of the ISD. He informed the committee that he was working with an outside evaluation firm to study the credentials of two education management groups that had applied to operate the selected ISD school (Robeson County’s Southside Ashpole Elementary).

*Note that a week after this meeting, a selection of an outside operator was made. The group that was chosen to run the school is Achievement for all Children, which is affiliated with a prominent school choice funder. The State Board of Education will be taking action on this at its monthly meeting this week.

To see the presentation materials click here.

Data Systems and Cybersecurity
Three presentations were given about various initaitives that have been implemented to enhance IT data systems and improve cybersecurity at K-12 schools. The presentation materials are below.

Data systems and cybersecurity presentation materials:
Click here
Click here
Click here

Cooperative Innovative High Schools
A presentation was given on the status of Career and College Promise/Cooperative Innovative High Schools around the state. Click here to see that presentation.

Next Meeting – Tuesday, April 3 at 10:00 AM in Room 643 LOB

JOINT LEGISLATIVE TASK FORCE ON EDUCATION FINANCE REFORM
This Task Force met for the fifth time on March 15. The meeting served as a follow up to last month’s meeting at which the committee discussed charter funding. A group of individual charter schools were invited to present on the funding challenges they are facing and reviewed what they think needs to be changed/improved about the current system of school funding. You can see the presentation materials here.

Next meeting – Wednesday, April 25 at 10:00 AM

HOUSE SCHOOL SAFETY COMMITTEE
This special committee formed to look at school safety issues held its first meeting on March 21. The committee heard several presentations on what is currently being done on school safety and then had a open-ended discussion. The presenters were as follows:

Sheriff Robert Holland, Task Force for Safer Schools Chairman and Kym Martin, Center for Safer Schools.

John Dorman, NC Emergency Management and Task Force for Safer Schools Member.

State Bureau of Investigation Senior Analyst Jody Marks and Acting Special Agent in Charge Elliott Smith.

Greta Metcalf, Meridian Behavioral Health Services and Chair of the Mental Health Committee of the Task Force for Safer Schools.

 

Dr. Jim Deni, N.C. School Psychology Association.

 

Caroline Daily, 8th Grade English Teacher, Vice-Chair of Task Force for Safer Schools.

 

Sarah Wallace Strickland and Riley Barnes, students and members of the Task Force for Safer Schools, on student perspectives on School Safety.

You can read more about this meeting here. You can find the presentation materials here.


JOINT LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM EVALUATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE 

The Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee met on March 26. At this meeting the committee signed off on recommendations from staff on how to modify the dispute resolution and litigation process between school boards and county commissioners concerning local funding levels. The recommendation is to keep the mediation process whereby a school board can ask for an independent arbiter to look at the dispute and try to negotiate an agreed upon funding level. If the mediator cannot come to any settlement, the staff recommendation is to establish a default funding formula that would determine what the local funding level should be. This would replace the option for the school board to take legal action. While draft legislation on this would still need to pass both chambers in 2018, a recommendation to move to this model would be eligible for consideration this session.

 

The committee also looked at a report on ways to increase education lottery revenues.

 

Read the study of the local school dispute mediation process here.

Read the study of increasing lottery revenue here.

STUDY COMITTEE ON DIVISION OF LEAS
This committee met on March 13 and March 28.

At the March 13 meeting the committee heard from legislative attorneys about some of the implementation, governance and constitutional questions surrounding smaller school districts. Bond and debt issues were also examined. Click here for the audio and presentation materials.

At the March 28 meeting the committee reviewed research findings on the relationship between school district size, student outcomes and finances. The study was conducted by the UNC college of public policy. Click here for presentation materials and audio from the meeting.

 

Next Meeting – Wednesday, April 4 at 9 AM.

CHILD FATALITY TASK FORCE
The Child Fatality Task Force met on March 7. Among the items discussed were recommendations from the group’s Intentional Death Prevention Committee. The subcommittee recommended:

– Continued support for required suicide prevention training and risk referral protocol in schools.

– Continued support for increasing the number of school nurses via increased funding to school nurse funding initiative.

– Continued support to fund a three-year lead suicide prevention coordinator position.

– Endorsement of funding for a School Social Worker consultant position at DPI.

 

Joint Legislative Emergency Management Oversight Committee
The Joint Legislative Emergency Management Oversight Committee met on March 15, 2018. The committee heard from an organization that aims to enhance cyber security of for schools and other groups that use connected devices. Find the materials here.

 

 

 

 


Sean HolmesNCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – March 2018
read more
NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – February 2018

NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – February 2018

NCSBA MONTHLY INTERIM LEGISLATIVE REPORT
FEBRUARY 2018

 



JOINT LEGISLATIVE EDUCATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

The General Assembly’s Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee held its fourth meeting of the interim on February 6.

Schools That Lead
The Committee heard about Schools That Lead (STL).  This organization “develops teacher leaders within and across schools, bringing a deep focus on student learning.  Key to this work is developing teacher leaders with the knowledge, skills and dispositions to build the social capital of their organizations.”

To see the presentation materials click here.

ENC STEM
An overview and update was provided on the Eastern North Carolina STEM initiative.  This initative “seeks to provide high quality STEM learning opportunities and leadership training to high school students living in economically disadvantaged communities in Eastern North Carolina.”

To see the presentation materials click here.

Next Meeting – Tuesday, March 6 at 10:00 AM in Room 643 LOB

JOINT LEGISLATIVE TASK FORCE ON ED FINANCE REFORM
The Task Force met for the fourth time on February 22 and heard from three presenters.  The meeting focused on charter school funding.  According to DPI – for the 2017-18 school year – there are 173 brick and mortar charter schools statewide with a population of more than 100,000 students.

Alexis Schauss with DPI explained how the state agency projects a charter school’s ADM, the process to determine funding amounts and the time frames charter schools receive funding.  Click here to view Schauss’ presentation.

Gregg Sinders with TeamCFA, a charter management organization, requested additional funds local, state, and federal sources.  Mr. Sinders also requested local and state dollars for charter school facilities, including:

-Allowing county commissioners to provide local tax dollars.
-Providing access to NC Education Lottery funds.
-Allow state budget dollars designated for school facilities to flow to charter schools.
-Provide start-up funds totaling $100-thousand per charter school.

Click here to view Sinders’ presentation

Steven Walker, General Counsel for Lt. Governor Dan Forest & member of the Charter School Advisory Committee agreed with Sinders that money should follow the child and that consideration should be given to allow county commissioners to provide charter schools with capital funds if they so choose.

Walker presented figures from 2013-14, complaining that charter school students were funded on the local level at 73% of traditional public-school students.  When asked by Rep. Craig Horn where the data came from, Walker responded that it is anecdotal and that the figures may not even be correct.  Click here to view Walker’s presentation.

Next meeting – Thursday, March 15 at 1:00 PM

SPEAKER FORMS HOUSE SCHOOL SAFETY COMMITTEE
In the wake of the Parkland school shootings, House Speaker Tim Moore this month formed a special House committee that will be charged with developing recommendations for how to improve safety in North Carolina’s public schools.  The Committee will be Chaired by Reps. David Lewis (R-Harnett) and John Torbett (R-Gaston).  The select committee has over 40 members from the House, including 9 former school board members (Reps. Susan Fisher, Rosa Gill, Verla Insko, Linda Johnson, Donny Lambeth, Chris Malone, Bobbie Richardson, Larry Strickland, Donna White).  To see all members of the committee click here.  Click here to read a press release about the formation of the committee.

JT. LEGISLATIVE STUDY COMMITTEE ON DIVISION OF LEAS
This special committee, formed via HB 704 from the 2017 session, is tasked with looking at data and reseach on the differences in school district sizes and providing that information to lawmakers.  The chair, Rep. Bill Brawley (R-Mecklenburg), has specified that this committee will not be recommending splitting up particular LEAs and is exploring if a process should be prescribed in statute much like the consolidation statutues are designed.

The Committee held its first meeting February 21.  At this meeting the Committee reviewed the ranges of funding levels for NC LEAs, data on NC school district sizes and a comparison of district sizes to student performance levels.

To see the presentation materials click here and here.
To see members of this committee click here.

Next meeting – Tuesday, March 13 at 1:00 PM

GOVERNOR’S LEANDRO COMMISSION
The Governor’s Commission on Access to a Sound Basic Education held its second meeting on February 20.  This Commission is comprised of representatives of school districts, community colleges and univerisites as well as non-profit and private sector organizations with an interest in public education and child welfare.  Their charge is to develop a pathway to provide all public school students with an opportunity for a sound basic education per Leandro.

At this second meeting the Commission focused on public school funding issues.

Context and Overview of NC’s School Funding
Karen Halwey Miles, CEO and president of national nonprofit Education Resource Strategies, provided information on how NC’s school funding system, teacher salaries, student performance, LEA funding distribution and other data compared to other states around the country.  Ms. Miles also talked about factors that need to be looked at in determining whether school funding is “adequate” and suggestions for building a more efficient and equitable funding system.

Click here to see the presentation materials.

State Funding for NC Schools
DPI’s Chief Financial Officer Adam Levinson outlined how the State’s school funding model works.

Local Funding for NC Schools
Keith Poston, Executive Director of the Public School Forum, provided notable data on local funding for public schools.  He talked about some of the main drivers of local funding disparities across NC’s local school districts.  Most of Mr. Poston’s presentation was based on information published in the Public School Forum’s annual local school finance study, which you can find here.

Perspectives from Superintendents
Three local district superintendents participated in a panel discussion to talk about financial challenges they are facing and tools they believe would help them improve educational outcomes in their districts.  The participating superintendents were: Dr. Janet Mason from Rutherford (the 2018 superintendent of the year), Dr. Tim Markley from New Hanover and Dr. Anthony Jackson from Vance.  Mr. Poston moderated the panel, which also included an opportunity for commission members to ask questions.

Governor’s Remarks
Governor Roy Cooper arrived during the afternoon portion of the meeting.  He reiterated the importance of the Commission’s work and talked about some of the educational and equity barriers he had been seeing during his visits to public schools across the state.

You can read more about this meeting via EdNC’s coverage by clicking here.

K-3 CLASS SIZE FIX TO BECOME LAW
Lawmakers this month struck a deal to phase-in the implementation of the K-3 class size reductions and establish a separate funding stream for program enhancement teachers.  HB 90, which also contained several other provisions pertaining to K-12 public education, passed overwhelmingly in a special session of the House and Senate.  Governor Roy Cooper later announced he would let the bill become law without his signature, citing portions of the bill that he and some Democrat lawmakers viewed as objectionable.

Lawmakers are expected back in Raleigh May 16 to begin their “short session.”  We do not anticipate any additional special sessions between now and then.

NCSBA had been working behind the scenes for months with key legislators to solve the K-3 class size chaos.  We cannot emphasize enough that this agreement would not have been possible without all your hard work at the local level.  Thank you once again for all your efforts keeping this issue front and center in your communities.

Below are more details of what is in HB 90 pertaining to K-12 public education.

K-3 Class Size Reduction Phase-In and Program Enhancement Teachers (Parts 2-5)

– Class size reduction implementation timeline:

Avg                      Max

2017-18:     1:20 (K-3)          1:23 (K-3)

2018-19:     1:20 (K-3)          1:23 (K-3)

2019-20:     1:19 (K-3)          1:22 (K-3)

2020-21:     1:18 (K-3)          1:21 (K-3)

2021-22:     1:18 (K)              1:21 (K)

1:16 (Grade 1)    1:19 (Grade 1)

1:17 (Grades 2-3)  1:20 (Grades 2-3)

2018-19 program enhancement teacher funding for grades K-5 will be $61,359,225, distributed at a ratio of 1:191 of K-5 program enhancement teachers.

Education Savings Accounts (Part 6)
The bill also makes some changes to the Education Savings Account program.  It still limits the awards to parents of children with disabilities eligible to enroll at a public school who have not received a high school diploma, but it loosens all the other eligibility requirements and just provides that the student not be placed in a nonpublic school by a public agency at public expense.  This broadens the eligibility for ESAs for parents who have never enrolled their student with a disability in the public school system.

NC Pre-K (Part 7)
This provision of the bill increases NC Pre-K funding by $9.35 million in each of fiscal years 2019-20 and 2020-21.  Total funding in the coming years will be as follows:

2017-18: $69.6 million
2018-19: $72.7 million
2019-20: $82 million
2020-21: $91.35 million

The legislative staff summary says that these appropriations should be enough to eliminate the NC Pre-K waitlist by 2020-21.

ACP Dollars (Part 1)
This provision would allocate the funds from a $57.8 million fund linked to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline to the LEAs in the counties that will be impacted by the pipeline.  The bill creates a formula for distributing the funding.  The estimated allocations from the formula to LEAs are below.

Cumberland: $15,115,607
Halifax: $1,920,839
Roanoke Rapids: $2,157,148
Weldon City: $642,996
Johnston: $11,998,658
Nash-Rocky Mount: $7,547,838
Northampton: $3,574,629
Robeson: $7,544,754
Sampson: $2,416,321
Clinton City: $875,403
Wilson: $4,005,807

Total: $57,800,000

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Sean Holmes
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Sean HolmesNCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – February 2018
read more
Bill Details – K3 Class Sizes and Other Ed Changes

Bill Details – K3 Class Sizes and Other Ed Changes

The K-3 class size fix bill (HB 90) has been made public.  HB 90 is an omnibus bill dealing with several education issues.  HB 90 is currently being discussed by a joint session of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees.  Follow us on Twitter @NCSBAGovtRel for up to the minute accounts of what is going on.

Below are more details of what is in the bill pertaining to public education.

K-3 Class Size Reduction Phase-In and Program Enhancement Teachers (Parts 2-5)
Here is the class size reduction implementation timeline:

Avg                      Max

2017-18:     1:20 (K-3)          1:23 (K-3)
2018-19:     1:20 (K-3)          1:23 (K-3)
2019-20:     1:19 (K-3)          1:22 (K-3)
2020-21:     1:18 (K-3)          1:21 (K-3)
2021-22:     1:18 (K)              1:21 (K)
1:16 (Grade 1)    1:19 (Grade 1)
1:17 (Grades 2-3)  1:17 (Grades 2-3)


Program enhancement teachers for grades K-5 will be funded at $61,359,225 for 2018-19 to be distributed at a ratio of 1:191 of K-5 program enhancement teachers.

Education Savings Accounts (Part 6)
The bill also makes some changes to the Education Savings Account program.  It still limits the awards to parents of children with disabilities eligible to enroll at a public school who have not received a high school diploma, but it loosens all the other eligibility requirements and just provides that the student not be placed in a nonpublic school by a public agency at public expense.  This broadens the eligibility for ESAs for parents who have never enrolled their student with a disability in the public school system.

NC Pre-K (Part 7)
This provision of the bill increases NC Pre-K funding by $9.35 million in each of fiscal years 2019-20 and 2020-21.  Total funding in the coming years will be as follows:
2017-18: $69.6 million
2018-19: $72.7 million
2019-20: $82 million
2020-21: $91.35 million

The legislative staff summary says that these appropriations should be enough to eliminate the NC Pre-K waitlist by 2020-21.

ACP Dollars (Part 1)
This provision would allocate the funds from a $57.8 million fund linked to the Atlantic Coast Pipeline to the LEAs in the counties that will be impacted by the pipeline.  The bill creates a formula for distributing the funding.  The estimated allocations from the formula to LEAs are below.

Cumberland: $15,115,607
Halifax: $1,920,839
Roanoke Rapids: $2,157,148
Weldon City: $642,996
Johnston: $11,998,658
Nash-Rocky Mount: $7,547,838
Northampton: $3,574,629
Robeson: $7,544,754
Sampson: $2,416,321
Clinton City: $875,403
Wilson: $4,005,807

Total: $57,800,000

 

Sean HolmesBill Details – K3 Class Sizes and Other Ed Changes
read more
NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – January 2018

NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – January 2018


JOINT LEGISLATIVE EDUCATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

The General Assembly’s Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee held its third meeting of the interim on January 9.

Virtual Charter Schools
Members received an update on the performance of the NC Virtual Academy, the virtual charter school pilot managed by K12, Inc..  Dr. Joel Medley, the head of the school, talked about student demographics, feedback from teachers and parents and other school performance factors.  Dr. Medley explained that the school’s withdrawal rate has been going down while enrollment has been increasing.  He requested to have the school’s pilot status changed to permanent rather than wait until the pilot runs its course.

To see the presentation materials click here.

Licensure
Dr. Maria Pitre-Martin, Deputy State Superintendent, gave an update on the teacher licensure process.  There was also a presentation on the results of a recent audit of DPI’s teacher licensure process.

To see the presentation materials click here and here.

Advanced Courses
Sneha Shah-Coltrane, Director of Advanced Learning and Gifted Education at DPI, updated the committee on AP/IB program enrollment.

To see the presentation materials click here.

Next Meeting – Tuesday, February 6 at 10:00 AM in Room 643 LOB
Click
here for the meeting agenda

JOINT LEGISLATIVE TASK FORCE ON EDUCATION FINANCE REFORM
The Joint Legislative Task Force on Education Finance Reform met on January 31.  Three local school district superintendents and three local school finance officers shared their perspectives on the current school funding system and items the task force should consider as it moves forward.  Common themes from their presentations included the need for more local flexibility in budgeting and the need to remove the local funding cap for students with disabilities.  They also talked about disentangling the charter school/school district funding relationship.

NCSBA Director of Governmental Relations Leanne Winner and NCASA Executive Director Katherine Joyce also spoke to the task force about the school funding system and considerations that should be taken into account in any reform effort.

The local superintendents who spoke were:

Dr. Stephen Fisher (Cleveland) click here for the presentation materials

Dr. Tim Markley (New Hanover) click here for the presentation materials

Dr. Rob Jackson (Edenton-Chowan) click here for the presentation materials

The finance officers who spoke were:

Jeff Hollamon (Onslow) click here for the presentation materials

Norris Barger (Transylvania) click here for the presentation materials

Carol Herndon (Rowan-Salisbury) click here for the presentation materials

Click here to see Ms. Winner’s presentation materials
Click here to see Ms. Joyce’s presentation materials

Next Meeting – Thursday, February 22 at 10:00 AM

PROGRAM EVALUATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE
The Program Evaluation Oversight Committee met on January 22 for the first time since 2016.  Staff released several new reports, 3 of which impact public schools:
A report on the county commissioner-school board dispute resolution process (click here to read)
A report on options for increasing lottery proceeds (click here to read)
A report on the demand for school nurses (click here to read)

The reports are expected to be discussed in detail at the committee’s next meeting on February 12.

The Committee also heard about a study of NC school capital needs in 9 LEAs that was conducted by an outside consulting group.  This study is separate from the DPI 5-year facility needs survey.  The group used its own methodology in looking at school building capacity and utilization.  They determined which LEAs having the highest facility needs in relation to their capacity to meet those needs and ability to pay.  Click here to read the report.

Next Meetings –
Monday, February 12 at 1:00 PM
Monday, February 26 at 1:00 PM

CHILD FATALITY TASK FORCE
The Child Fatality Task Force met on January 17.  The Committee voted to support legislation to require suicide prevention training for school staff (HB 285) and increase funding for school nurses.

Next Meeting – Tuesday, February 6 at 10 AM (intentional death prevention committee); Tuesday, February 13 at 10 AM (unintentional death prevention committee)

JOINT LEGISLATIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE
The Joint Legislative Emergency Management Oversight Committee met on January 25.  The committee received an update on school safety initiatives.  Click here to read more about what occurred at this meeting.

Click here and here to see the presentation materials.

SPECIAL SESSION
The General Assembly convened for a special session on Wednesday, January 10.  Lawmakers did NOT take up the K-3 class size mandate and did NOT do anything on school administrator pay.  However, House and Senate leaders are reportedly making progress on the class size issue.  If anything transpires on this issue we will send out an alert immediately.

NOTABLE UPCOMING MEETINGS
The Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee will next meet on February 6 at 10:00 AM.

The Joint Legislative Task Force on Education Finance Reform will next meet on February 22 at 10:00 AM.

The Joint Legislative Program Evaluation Oversight Committee will meet on February 12 at 1:00 PM and February 26 at 1:00 PM.

The Child Fatality Task Force will hold subcommittee meetings on February 6 at 10 AM and February 13 at 10 AM.

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Sean Holmes
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Sean HolmesNCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – January 2018
read more
NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – December 2017

NCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – December 2017

JOINT LEGISLATIVE EDUCATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE
The General Assembly’s Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee held its second meeting of the interim on December 5.

Notable Presentation Topic – Lab Schools
Members received an update on the progress of Lab Schools, experimental schools UNC has been mandated to create in partnership with some LEAs around NC.  Two Lab Schools have already opened – a grade 2-4 school in Pitt County run by ECU; and a grade 6-8 school in Jackson County run by Western Carolina.  Three Lab Schools are in planning stages to open in Fall 2018- one in Winston-Salem/Forsyth run by Appalachian State; one in New Hanover County run by UNC Wilmington; and one in Rockingham County run by UNC Greensboro.  Plans are being developed for opening Lab Schools in 2019 in Robeson (run by UNC Pembroke), Charlotte-Mecklenburg (run by UNC Charlotte), and one to be run by NC State (location to be determined).  The presentation also reviewed data on the types of students enrolled in Lab Schools along with areas of the law that may need tweaking.

To see the presentation materials click here and here.

Note that Lab Schools will be one of the presentation topics at NCSBA’s upcoming Public Policy Conference.  See below for more information.

Notable Presentation Topic – Teaching Fellows
An update was provided on the implementation of the reestablished and redesigned Teaching Fellows program.

To see the presentation materials click here

Next Meeting – Tuesday, January 9 at 10:00 AM in Room 643 LOB

JOINT LEGISLATIVE TASK FORCE ON EDUCATION FINANCE REFORM
The Joint Legislative Task Force on Education Finance Reform met on December 13 and heard DPI’s response to the PED report’s critique of the school funding system as well as information about the School Business Division process.

Adam Levinson, DPI’s Chief Financial Officer, pointed out some areas where DPI disagreed with the PED report findings (click here for the full report) but acknowledged that there are still some areas where the school funding system can be improved.  “Clearly some improvement is possible,” he told the Committee.  “But the extent of that improvement should be considered very carefully.”

Alexis Schauss, Director of School Business at DPI, reviewed how the school business process at DPI operates.
Click here to see Mr. Levinson’s presentation materials.
Click here to see Ms. Schauss’ presentation materials.

Click here to read more about this meeting from the News & Observer.

Next Meeting – Thursday, January 18 at 10:00 AM in Room 643 LOB
*At this meeting the Committee will hear from 3 LEA superintendents, 3 LEA finance officers, and NCSBA Director of Governmental Relations Leanne Winner.

UPCOMING SESSION NEWS
Special Session
The General Assembly will convene on Wednesday, January 10 for a special session.  Lawmakers could take up several different items during this session, including: judicial redistricting, constitutional amendments, vetoes, pending conference reports, bills responding to legal challenges and local bills that passed the originating chamber.

NCSBA’s primary advocacy efforts this special session will be discussing and urging lawmakers to alter the implementation of the K-3 class size reductions as well as addressing several concerns with the new principal pay and bonus program.  NCSBA is urging lawmakers to address both these issues prior to the start of the May short session.  Be sure to check the NCSBA Governmental Relations Twitter feed for important updates during the special session (@NCSBAGovtRel).

The NCSBA Board of Directors passed a resolution on the K-3 class size reduction implementation in November.  This resolution was sent to all members of the General Assembly after Thanksgiving.  If your board has passed a locally tailored version of this resolution please be sure to send it to your local delegation and Speaker Moore and Senate leader Berger, if you have not already done so.

NCSBA Appearance on Education Matters
Bruce Mildwurf, NCSBA Assistant Director of Governmental Relations, will be appearing on the next episode of the NC Public School Forum’s television program Education Matters.  We encourage you to catch this episode as Mr. Mildwurf talks about the K-3 class size issue and some of the other items being discussed at the General Assembly that are of concern to local school districts.

How/when can you watch Education Matters?
Saturday, January 6 at 7:30 PM, WRAL-TV (Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)
– Sunday, January 7 at 8:00 AM, FOX 50 (Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville)
– Sunday, January 7 at 6:30 AM and Wednesday, January 10 at 9:30 AM, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Channel (Statewide).  The North Carolina Channel can be found on Time Warner Cable/Spectrum Channel 1277.

You can now also listen to Education Matters as a Podcast on iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, PodBean, Overcast and Google Play Music.

NCSBA PUBLIC POLICY CONFERENCE
NCSBA’s January Public Policy conference is only a few weeks away!  Registration remains open for the January 25-26, 2018, conference in Raleigh.  We have an exciting agenda covering several important public policy topics for local school districts.

Click here register.  Click here to find the draft agenda and hotel recommendations.

NOTABLE UPCOMING MEETINGS
The Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee will next meet on January 9 at 10:00 AM in Room 643 LOB.

The Joint Legislative Task Force on Education Finance Reform will next meet on January 18 at 10:00 AM in Room 643 LOB.

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Sean HolmesNCSBA Monthly Interim Legislative Report – December 2017
read more