Rebekah Howard

NCSBA Legislative Alert – March 20, 2020

NCSBA Legislative Alert – March 20, 2020

The Fight Against the Coronavirus

This is the first of weekly Legislative Alerts that the NCSBA Governmental Relations team will be sending out each Friday afternoon as the coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to affect our districts, our state, our country, and the world. We will be covering actions taken by the Governor, the NC General Assembly, the State Board of Education, the federal government, and other governing bodies in this fight against the coronavirus. Additionally, NCSBA has created a webpage that provides information and resources about COVID-19, which includes links to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.

From the Governor and the Department of Health and Human Services

    • On February 11 Governor Cooper issued his first press release concerning the coronavirus, which announced the creation of a state Novel Coronavirus Task Force, recommended steps to prevent the spread of the virus, and provided resources to learn more about the virus.
    • On March 3 the Governor and the Task Force held a press conference announcing the first North Carolinian to test positive for the COVID-19.
    • On March 10 the Governor declared a state of emergency in response to the coronavirus in Executive Order 116. The press release contains recommendations from DHHS regarding high-risk persons, congregate living facilities, mass gatherings, travel, and workplace settings.
    • On March 12 Governor Cooper announced that there were currently 15 reported cases of the coronavirus in North Carolina. DHHS provided further recommendations, including recommendations for schools.
    • On March 14 the Governor issued Executive Order 117. The press release highlighted the closing of K-12 public schools, the banning of gatherings of more than 100 people, and the creation of the Governor’s Education and Nutrition Working Group.
    • On March 17 Governor Cooper announced Executive Order 118 that closed restaurants and bars for dine-in/sit-down customers, but continues to allow takeout and delivery.
    • On March 18 the Governor issued a press release about the NC 2-1-1, which provides free and confidential information on health and human services and a phone number that North Carolinians can use to sign up for alerts about the virus.
    • On March 19 Governor Cooper announced that his request for the U.S. Small Business Administration to provide aid for business owners in North Carolina that are experiencing economic losses as a result of the coronavirus had been granted.

DHHS created a webpage to keep North Carolinians updated on the State’s response to COVID-19.

Governor’s Education and Nutrition Working Group

NCSBA is a member of the Governor’s Education and Nutrition Working Group that is tasked with ensuring the health, safety, educational needs, and wellbeing of children during school and childcare closure, as directed by Governor Cooper’s Executive Order 117. The Working Group met for the first time on Thursday, March 19 and established the following goals:

    • Ensure families have access to safe, affordable childcare and out-of-school-time care options, especially healthcare workers and other front-line workers
    • Ensure children have access to nutritious food while schools and childcare programs are closed
    • Ensure children continue to participate in structured learning while schools and childcare programs are closed

The Working Group shared the following about each of its goals:

    • Childcare
      • 50% of childcare centers are still open
      • A hotline is being developed to connect available care with parents in essential industries like healthcare and emergency management
      • At this time, the arrangement of childcare for essential personnel will not be free, but funding sources are being sought
    • Nutrition
      • All LEAs are participating in food distribution for students
      • An app will be released next week that allows students and parents to find nearby food distribution points
      • DPI is trying to locate any underserved areas
    • Online learning

If you have concerns about these issues that you would like the Working Group to address, please email Richard Bostic at rbostic@ncsba.org.

 

From the NC General Assembly

According to a memorandum from legislative leaders on Thursday, March 12, the General Assembly has cancelled all committee, commission, and task force meetings until April 1 at the earliest. Legislators and legislative staffers will be working remotely until April. The General Assembly is still set to convene in the 2020 short session on Tuesday, April 28. Click here to access the memo. Click here to access the NC General Assembly’s webpage concerning the coronavirus.

House Select Committee on COVID-19

On Thursday, March 19 House Speaker Tim Moore appointed 72 legislators to the new House Select Committee on COVID-19. The Select Committee will meet remotely and, unless directed by the Speaker, will only meet in its four working groups: health care, economic support, continuity of state operations, and education. The Select Committee may study the following:

    • Documented and anticipated economic impacts associated with the spread of COVID-19
    • Measures necessary to provide economic and regulatory relief
    • Existing authorities, procedures, policies, and resources dedicated to responding to the spread of infectious diseases like COVID-19
    • Legislative actions to more effectively address the impacts and challenges caused by COVID-19
    • Measures necessary to maintain the essential functions of North Carolina government during a pandemic

The Select Committee may submit an interim report and a final report of its findings, including any proposed legislation. Speaker Moore appointed Representatives John Fraley, R-Iredell; Craig Horn, R-Union; and Ashton Clemmons, D-Guilford to be the chairs of the education working group. Click here to access the Speaker’s announcement of the Select Committee, which provides a full list of committee and working group members.

 

From the State Board of Education and the Department of Public Instruction

The SBE held conference call meetings on March 14 and March 18. The following topics were discussed in the meetings.

The SBE also released two memorandums that provide guidance to school and district leaders regarding personnel matter, school facilities, and clarification related to the issue of teachers working remotely during the statewide closure of schools. Click here and here to access the memorandums.

 

From Congress

Congress has approved H.R. 6201: Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which guarantees free coronavirus testing, establishes paid leave, enhances Unemployment Insurance, expands food security initiatives, and increases federal Medicaid funding. The portions of the bill of interest to the education community are as follows (summaries provided by Congressional staff).

    • The bill includes a general provision that allows the Department of Agriculture to approve state plans to provide emergency Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) food assistance to households with children who would otherwise receive free or reduced-price meals if not for their schools being closed due to the COVID-19 emergency. In order to be eligible, the child’s school must be closed for no less than 5 consecutive days.
    • The Legislation allows all child and adult care centers to operate as non-congregate (i.e. allows them to take food to go). Allows the Secretary of Agriculture to waive meal pattern requirements in child nutrition programs if there is a disruption to the food supply as a result of the COVID-19 emergency. Provides the Secretary of Agriculture the authority to issue nationwide school meal waivers during the COVID-19 emergency, which will eliminate paperwork for states and help more schools quickly adopt and utilize flexibilities.
    • The bill requires employers with fewer than 500 employees and government employers to provide employees two weeks of paid sick leave, paid at the employee’s regular rate, to quarantine or seek a diagnosis or preventive care for coronavirus; or paid at two-thirds the employee’s regular rate to care for a family member for such purposes or to care for a child whose school has closed or child care provider is unavailable, due to the coronavirus.
      • Full-time employees are entitled to two weeks (80 hours), and part-time employees are entitled to the typical number of hours that they work in a typical two-week period.
      • The bill ensures employees who work under a multiemployer collective agreement and whose employers pay into a multiemployer plan are provided with leave.

Click here for a full summary of H.R. 6201.

The Act, and the requirements under the Act, expire on December 31, 2020.

 

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Alert – March 20, 2020
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NCSBA Legislative Update – March 6, 2020

NCSBA Legislative Update – March 6, 2020

The Results are In!

North Carolina held its primary elections on Tuesday, March 3. One race has already declared a runoff election for May 12. To avoid a runoff, the leading candidate must gain at least 30% of the vote. Republicans in the 11th Congressional district, where Representative Mark Meadows is vacating his seat, will have to choose between Lynda Bennett who gained 23% of the vote and Madison Cawthorn who had 20% of the vote.

The Democratic Lieutenant Governor race has also qualified for a runoff. State Representative Yvonne Holley, D-Wake, gained 26.5% of the vote and State Senator Terry Van Duyn, D-Buncombe, had 20.5% of the vote. Van Duyn has stated that she is taking until Tuesday, March 10 to consider a runoff election.

Two incumbent NC legislators were defeated on Tuesday: Representative Elmer Floyd, D-Cumberland and Senator Eddie Gallimore, R-Davidson. Kimberly Hardy, a school social worker, beat Representative Floyd by gaining 56% of the vote. Floyd has served in the House since 2008 and was running in a recently redrawn district. Senator Gallimore, a first-term senator, was defeated by Representative Steve Jarvis, R-Davidson with 53% of the vote.

Also on the ballot were candidates for State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Below are the results, with Jen Mangrum and Catherine Truitt winning the Democrat and Republican primaries respectively. Jen Mangrum is a UNCG School of Education associate professor and previously ran against Senate President Pro Tempore Phil Berger, R-Rockingham, in 2018. Click here to access Mangrum’s campaign website. Catherine Truitt is the chancellor of Western Governors University NC and was the education advisor for former Republican Governor Pat McCrory. Click here to access Truitt’s campaign website.

 

Democrats

Jen Mangrum 33.14%
Keith Sutton 26.64%
Constance (Lav) Johnson 21.11%
James Barrett 10.77%
Michael Maher 8.34%

 

Republicans

Catherine Truitt 56.67%
Craig Horn 43.33%

 

All State House and Senate seats were on the ballot.

Click here to see NC House and Senate candidates.

Click here to see NC House and Senate races to watch.

Some counties also voted on local sales tax and bond referenda. Click here to see those results.

For all other primary election results, including local school boards, click here to navigate the State Board of Elections website.

 

Fines and Forfeitures/School Technology Resolution

We would like to thank the 105 school districts (click here to see list) that have shared and advocated for their adopted resolutions. Members of the NCSBA Governmental Relations team continue to work towards an agreement for the unpaid $730 million for school technology in the weeks leading up to the legislature reconvening on April 28. To read more background on this court judgment, click here.

If your district adopted the resolution but you do not see it listed, please email a copy of your resolution to Rebekah Howard at rhoward@ncsba.org. If your district has not adopted the resolution, click here to access a draft resolution for your school board to consider at its next meeting.

 

State Board of Education – March 4 & 5

This month’s Board meeting discussions included the SBE’s recommendations for teachers who administer the NC Final Exams, the SBE’s consolidated report on student discipline, and a recently executed SBE contract.

SB 621/S.L. 2019-212 eliminates the NC Final Exams and requires the SBE and DPI to submit “a plan on how to use other means to accomplish the purposes for which data is collected by the NC Final Exam.” The Board was presented with an assessment model that would measure teacher effectiveness under three lenses: professional practice, instructional practice, and student growth. Board members discussed the importance of a standardized assessment in evaluating teacher effectiveness, which was the purpose of the NC Final Exams. On Thursday, the Board voted to approve the submission of the assessment model but acknowledged that there is still the responsibility of establishing a measurement of teacher effectiveness until this new model can be implemented. To read the SBE’s and DPI’s alternative for measuring teacher effectiveness, click here.

Board members were also presented with a Consolidated Data Report for the 2018-2019 school year that includes the following annual reports: school crime & violence, suspensions & expulsions, the use of corporal punishment, reassignments for disciplinary reasons, alternative learning placements, and dropout rates. Although the rate of reportable crimes has decreased for the third year in a row, there was much discussion about the disproportional number of black students being expelled, compared to other racial and ethnic groups. The high rates of American Indian, black, and multiracial students being placed into alternative learning programs was also cause for concern. Many Board members expressed recommendations for reports in the years to come, mostly concerning differentiating between reportable offenses and subjective offenses, like disrespect and insubordination. Goal I of the SBE’s strategic plan is to eliminate opportunity gaps by 2025, which contains the objective of decreasing the number of exclusionary discipline practices by subgroup. To read the annual report, click here. To read an article summarizing the report and the Board’s discussion, click here.

The Board also engaged in a heated discussion concerning a contract that State Superintendent Mark Johnson claims was not executed under Board policy. Superintendent Johnson stated that the contract signed with the Southern Regional Education Board, who presented to the SBE last month about recommended changes to the school performance grade system, was for $31,000. Contracts over $25,000 require competitive bidding, which Johnson claimed he found no evidence of. Chairman Eric Davis acknowledged his fault in signing the contract and stated that issues with the contract were being addressed. The conversation did not stop there, with Superintendent Johnson attempting to dig deeper into the error. This discussion follows last month’s introduction of proposed amendments to the SBE’s policy concerning the State Superintendent’s discretion in spending state money. Those proposed amendments were a result of Superintendent Johnson’s emergency purchase to extend the state’s contract with Istation on January 7, 2020. To read more about the discussion at this month’s meeting, click here and here.

 

Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee

The JLEOC met on Friday, March 6 to learn about child nutrition and career and technical education (CTE) programs.

 

Child Nutrition

Dr. Lynn Harvey, DPI Director of School Nutrition and District Operations, reported that North Carolina has the seventh largest School Nutrition Program in the country, with 60% of our students qualifying for free or reduced meals. In school year 2019-2020, 104 LEAs (57 LEAs district-wide and 47 LEAs in selected schools) participated in the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) of the National School Lunch Program that provides meals to all students at no charge, regardless of economic status. Representatives from Bladen and Cumberland counties explained how CEP is working in their districts. Julie Pittman, Educator Outreach Manager for No Kid Hungry North Carolina, said hunger is an education issue, an economic issue, and a health issue. Three out of four public school teachers say that students regularly come to school hungry. Hungry children are sick more often, recover more slowly, and are hospitalized more frequently. And children struggling with hunger are more likely to drop out of high school. Ms. Pittman advocated for more state funding of school meal programs.

 

Career and Technical Education (CTE) 

Alexis Schauss, DPI Chief Business Officer, explained that the CTE Program is funded 95% by the state ($476 million) and 5% by the federal Perkins Act ($25 million) for FY 2019-2020. Representatives from CTE programs in Onslow and Randolph counties were concerned about inadequate funding for their programs. Nancy Cross, Randolph County CTE Director, said that funds are allotted for students in grades 8-12, but the programs serve students in grades 6-12 (some serve even younger grades). Ms. Cross also had the following comments: (1) LEAs send part of their CTE funds to charter schools even though charter schools do not have to use the funds for CTE, (2) the state does not adequately fund the cost of seeking industry credentials enrolled in trade programs, and (3) the position of a CTE coordinator in schools should be considered an essential position (like a counselor) and be given a separate funding allotment

 

Click here to access all meeting materials.

The next Education Oversight meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, March 11 at 10:00 am in Room 1027/1128 of the Legislative Building.

 

 

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – March 6, 2020
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NCSBA Legislative Update – February 7, 2020

NCSBA Legislative Update – February 7, 2020

Leandro Update

On January 21, 2020, Judge David Lee of the Leandro case released a consent order, following the release of the WestEd report in December of 2019. The WestEd report provides recommendations for how the state can best achieve its constitutional requirement of providing every student with the opportunity to a sound basic education. Click here to access the WestEd report. Judge Lee’s consent order agreed with the WestEd report findings and required the parties in the case to present a plan within 60 days that addresses the following:

  1. A high-quality teacher in each classroom
  2. A high-quality principal in each school
  3. A finance system that provides adequate, equitable, and predictable funding to school districts
  4. An accountability system that reliably assesses multiple measures of student performance
  5. An assistance and turnaround function to provide support to low-performing schools and districts
  6. A system of early education to ensure that all students enter kindergarten on track for school success
  7. Alignment of high school to postsecondary and career expectations

Click here to access the complete consent order.

Following the release of the consent order, The Senate Education Committee has invited Judge Lee to provide insight and recommendations on education policy. Republican Legislative leaders claim that there was minimal consultation from WestEd during the development of the report, which is why the Committee is requesting a time to collaborate with Judge Lee on the implementation of the report. The Senate Education Committee hopes to meet with Judge Lee in the upcoming short session, which starts on April 28.

 

State Board of Education – February 5 & 6

This month’s Board agenda included approval of the 2019 Annual Charter School Report, the Annual Report on the State of the Teaching Profession, and amendments to SBE policy concerning emergency purchases and compliance between SBE and DPI.

The 2019 Annual Charter School Report was presented to the Board last month, during which there was lengthy discussion on the changes that had been made to the report by the Charter School Advisory Board. At this month’s meeting Vice Chair Alan Duncan and Board member Jill Camnitz both expressed their concern about many areas of the report that are less data-driven and more qualitative. Board member Camnitz, Vice Chair Duncan, and Chair Eric Davis did not join the rest of the Board in approval of the report. Click here to read the redlined version of the report, and click here to read the approved version of the report.

According to the Annual Report on the State of the Teaching Profession, teacher attrition was 7.5% for the 2018-19 school year, which is a decrease from 8.1% in 2017-18 and 8.7% in 2016-17. Data from the 2017-18 school year shows that teachers who departed from NC public school employment have lower Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS) scores than those who remained in NC public schools. Data on teacher attrition by region notes that teachers are leaving NC public schools at the highest rate in the Northeast, Sandhills, and Southeast. The report dives deeper into these findings and explains the implications of the data on NC public schools, teachers, and students. Click here to access the report.

Following last month’s controversy over State Superintendent Mark Johnson’s decision to extend the state’s contract with Istation through an emergency purchase, the Board considered proposed amendments to the SBE’s policy concerning the State Superintendent’s discretion in spending state money. The proposed amendments include a monthly (or upon the request of a Board member) spending report from the Superintendent to the Board and that the Superintendent provide the State Board Chair prior notice before executing emergency contracts if time permits. Whether or not prior approval was given for the contract, the Superintendent would be required to provide a written explanation of the emergency purchase to the Board.

 

Legislative Committee Meetings

Joint Legislative Education Oversight Committee

The Committee met on Tuesday, February 4 to review the implementation of SB 599: Excellent Educators for Every Classroom/SL 2017-189, which concerns Educator Preparation Programs (EPPs). The major components of SB 599 are as follows:

  • Created the Professional Educator Preparation and Standards Commission (PEPSC) to advise the State Board of Education (SBE) on standards for educator preparation, licensure, continuing education, and conduct
  • Required the SBE to annually evaluate EPPs and sanction those that fail to meet performance standards
  • Authorized entities other than colleges and universities to be EPPs
  • Replaced the lateral entry teacher program with the residency license (RL) program that requires enrollment in an EPP

Dr. Tom Tomberlin, DPI Director of Educator Recruitment and Support, reported that so far there have been 50 EPPs approved by the state, five of which are not traditional colleges or universities. Additionally, as of January 1, 2020, 4,678 teachers were under the lateral entry license, which will be completely replaced with RL by June 30, 2022, and 895 teachers were under the new RL.

The next Education Oversight meeting is scheduled for Friday, March 6 at 10:00 am in Room 1228/1327 of the Legislative Building.

 

House Select Committee on School Safety 

The Committee met on Thursday, February 6. Legislative staff reported the status of the five bills filed in the 2019 Session on behalf of the Committee:

Robert Trumbo, Executive Director of DPI’s Center for Safer Schools, spoke about several initiatives in his program, including:

  • Say Something Anonymous Reporting System phone app
    • Phasing in – 382 schools so far
    • 1,472 tips received to date, resulting in reporting 91 life safety issues to local authorities
    • Staff has worked with 62 of 115 LEAs
  • $38.8 million in school safety grants awarded from the HB 75 appropriation
  • Threat assessment training provided to schools by his 5 person staff

William Ray, Chief of Staff for the Division of Emergency Management & Office of Recovery and Resiliency, told the committee that his agency has not yet established a “ statewide panic alarm system for the purposes of launching real-time 911 messaging to public safety answering points of internal and external risks to the school population, school buildings, and school related activities.” (G.S. 115C-105.51) The General Assembly has not yet appropriated funds for a digital panic alarm system, which is estimated to cost up to $37 million.

 

School Technology Resolution

We would like to thank the 94 school districts (click here to see list) that have shared and advocated for their adopted resolutions. Members of the NCSBA Governmental Relations team have and will continue to work on the issue of the unpaid public school funds in the months leading up to the legislature reconvening on April 28. To read more background on the unpaid $730 million that the state still owes for school technology per a 2008 court judgement, click here.

If your district adopted the resolution but you do not see it listed, please email a copy of your resolution to Rebekah Howard at rhoward@ncsba.org. If your district has not adopted the resolution, click here to access a draft resolution for your school board to consider at its next meeting.

 

Candidate Filing

Candidate filing closed on Friday, December 20, 2019.

Click here to view which NC House and Senate candidates will be on the ballot in your district.

Click here to view a list of all candidates who will appear on 2020 ballots in NC.

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – February 7, 2020
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NCSBA Legislative Update – January 17, 2020

NCSBA Legislative Update – January 17, 2020

January 14, 2020 Legislative Session

The 2019 very “long session” is one for North Carolina’s history books. The General Assembly adjourned this week, more than a year after first gaveling in on January 9, 2019. This is the first time a long session has ended in a different calendar year than it started. It’s also the first time lawmakers headed home until the short session without passing a new state budget.

The marathon session wrapped up on Tuesday, January 14, 2020, several hours after reconvening. The Senate did not attempt to override Governor Cooper’s veto of the state budget after Senate Leader Phil Berger determined that there were not enough votes for an override. Instead there was a failed attempt by the Senate to override the Governor’s veto of SB 354: Strengthening Educators’ Pay Act, which would have given non-certified and central office employees a 1% raise and an additional pay raise beyond step increases for teachers and assistant principals. The vote to override was along party lines.

Senator Berger stated during a morning press conference before Tuesday’s session that he believes the budget impasse will continue through the 2020 short session. Click here to access the press conference.

The legislature will reconvene for its 2020 short session on Tuesday, April 28.

Click here to access NCSBA’s 2019 Legislative Summary.

 

School Technology Resolution

Members of the NCSBA Governmental Relations team have met with House and Senate appropriations and education committee chairs, who are receptive to the fact that action should be taken to address the unpaid $730 million that the state still owes to public schools per a 2008 court judgment. Per state law, those funds should have been used exclusively for school technology but were instead unconstitutionally diverted by several state agencies to other purposes. For more background on this case, click here.

We would like to thank the 88 school districts (click here to see list) that have already shared and advocated their adopted resolutions. While there is still no commitment to a long-term plan, we know that your adopted resolutions are making an impact on some legislators who have recognized their district’s efforts in advocating the need for the school technology funds. We will continue to work on this issue with legislators during the interim leading up to their reconvening on April 28th.

If your district adopted the resolution but you do not see it listed, please email a copy of your resolution to Rebekah Howard at rhoward@ncsba.org. If your district has not adopted the resolution, click here to access an updated draft resolution for your school board to consider at its next meeting.

 

 

Click Here for the Conference Agenda.

Click Here to Register.

Conference Cost: $325

 

State Board of Education – January 8 & 9

This month the State Board of Education welcomed the 2019 Raleigh Dingman Award winner, Monte Herring. Mr. Herring will serve as the State Board’s local board of education advisor for the 2020 year. This month’s Board agenda included the 2019 Annual Charter School Report, the Istation reading assessment contract, and new graduation requirements that will implement the legislatively mandated Economics and Personal Finance course (EPF).

The annual charter school report informed the Board that charter schools account for 7.6% of the total state public school student population and that there are approximately 65,000 students on charter school waiting lists. The report contains charts and goals that were reworked by the Charter School Advisory Board (CSAB) prior to presentation to the State Board. The intent was to put a more positive spin on charter schools’ impact on student diversity, school grades, and funding. Click here to read an article that highlights the report changes, and click here to read the updated report that was presented to the Board. Board approval of the charter school report is still pending.

The Board did vote to approve DPI’s proposed social studies graduation requirements. The chart below shows the current requirements compared to what the Board approved in order to include the new EPF course.

The Board also discussed the state’s K-3 reading assessment dispute concerning an emergency purchase that was made on Tuesday, January 7 by State Superintendent Mark Johnson to extend the state’s contract with Istation, which is currently under legal review. Because the Board was not informed prior to Johnson’s purchase, Chairman Eric Davis verbally confirmed that the Board did not play a role in the emergency procurement. Since the Board meeting, the state’s Chief Information Officer of the Department of Information Technology (DIT) has challenged if Johnson’s purchase constituted an “emergency”. Click here to read more on the issue and Johnson’s response. Additionally, this week marked the beginning of hearings concerning the merits of the Istation contract that was awarded in 2019. Click here and here for media coverage of the hearings.

 

Candidate Filing

Candidate filing closed on Friday, December 20, 2019.

Click here to view which NC House and Senate candidates will be on the ballot in your district.

Click here to view a list of all candidates who will appear on 2020 ballots in NC.

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – January 17, 2020
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NCSBA Legislative Update – December 19, 2019

NCSBA Legislative Update – December 19, 2019

Early bird rate: $250   –   After January 3: $325

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

 

State Superintendent Candidates Forum

Craig Horn, NC Legislator

Catherine Truitt, Western Governors University NC Chancellor

 

Leandro Report – What It Means for Districts & Next Steps

Rick Glazier, NC Justice Center Executive Director

 

Changes to the Innovative School District

JB Buxton, State Board of Education Member

James Ellerbe, ISD Superintendent

 

Education Culture Transformation – A Model to Boost Student Success by Improving Teacher Recruitment, Retention, & Leadership

Julie Pittman, 2018 Western NC Teacher of the Year, EDLead NC

Freebird McKinney, 2018 NC Teacher of the Year, EDLead NC

 

Class Action Lawsuit: NC School Districts vs. Vaping Companies (Juul)

Gary Jackson & Hoyt Tessener, James Scott Farrin

 

Localizing myFutureNC – Rowan County Leaders Discuss Their Process to Maximize Educational Attainment & Economic Prosperity

Rowan Education Collaborative & myFutureNC

 

Competency-Based Learning: The What & Why – A NC Principal Shares Successes & Challenges

            Carroll Middle School Principal, Assistant Principal, & Students


2020 Election Landscape with Newly Drawn Districts

Anna Beavon Gravely, NC Free

 

All We have to Do is Explain It to Them, Right? – A Proven Method to Effective Advocacy

Joe Stewart, IIANC VP of Governmental Affairs

 

CLICK HERE FOR A DRAFT AGENDA

 

Leandro Report Released

A long-awaited report in the 25-year-old Leandro case was released last week by Judge David Lee. In 2018 Judge Lee appointed WestEd, an independent consultant, to develop recommendations for the state to best achieve its constitutional requirement of providing every student with the opportunity to a sound basic education.

The 301-page WestEd report contains an initial action plan, background on North Carolina’s public education system, findings, recommendations, and a collection of appendices that provide brief summaries of additional studies done by WestEd and other organizations. The findings and recommendations are centered around eight critical needs:

  1. Adequate, equitable, and aligned finance and resource allocation
  2. A qualified and well-prepared teacher in every classroom
  3. A qualified and well-prepared principal in every school
  4. High-quality early childhood education
  5. Support for high-poverty schools
  6. State assessment system and school accountability system
  7. Regional/statewide supports for school improvement
  8. Monitoring the state’s compliance

WestEd believes that its recommendations and action steps will better equip North Carolina in providing economically disadvantaged students with a greater chance of becoming academically successful and career and college ready.

Click here to access the WestEd report.

The report has drawn responses from numerous state government officials. Click here to access an article containing public statements about the report and supporting reports provided by WestEd.

For more on what this report means for your district and the next steps in the Leandro case, consider attending NCSBA’s 2020 Public Policy Conference on January 23-24. The conference includes a session on the WestEd report presented by Rick Glazier, Executive Director of the NC Justice Center. Click here to register.

 

School Technology Resolution

NCSBA has been hard at work trying to formulate a responsible payment option for the unpaid $730 million that the state still owes to public schools per a 2008 court judgment. The judge ruled that those funds should have been used exclusively for school technology but were instead unconstitutionally diverted by several state agencies to other purposes. For more background on this case, click here.

We would like to thank the 69 school districts (click here to see list) that have already shared and advocated their adopted resolutions. We encourage each district to consider how these funds could benefit their students. If your district adopted the resolution but you do not see it listed, please email a copy of your resolution to Rebekah Howard at rhoward@ncsba.org.

 

Candidate Filing

Candidate filing opened on Monday, December 2 and closes on Friday, December 20.

Click here to view a list of all NC House and Senate candidates.

Click here to view a list of all candidates who will appear on 2020 ballots in NC.

 

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – December 19, 2019
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NCSBA Legislative Update – December 6, 2019

NCSBA Legislative Update – December 6, 2019

2020 Public Policy Conference

Early bird rate: $250   –   After January 3: $325

CLICK HERE FOR DRAFT AGENDA

2020 Election Landscape – How Races are Shaping Up in the Newly Drawn Districts

Anna Beavon Gravely, NC Free Enterprise

 

Transforming an Education Culture – Tips & Tools to Improve Teacher Recruitment, Retention, Leadership, & Effectiveness

Freebird McKinney & Julie Pittman

 

A Roadmap to Locally Maximize Educational Attainment & Economic Alignment

MyFutureNC & Rowan Education Collaborative

 

State School Superintendent Candidates Forum

Candidates Who Did Not Participate in the Candidates Forum at Annual Conference

 

All We Have to Do is Explain it to Them, Right? A Proven Method to Effective Advocacy

Joe Stewart

 

Competency-Based Learning: “In a Proficiency System, Failure or Poor Performance May Be Part of the Student’s Learning Curve, But it is Not an Outcome.” A NC Principal Shares Successes, Challenges, & Shows How Your District Can Implement this Education Model

Elizabeth MacWilliams, James Aldridge, Carrol Middle School Students

 

Innovative School District (ISD) – Changes You Need to Know

JB Buxton & James Ellerbe

 

What Else is Trending at the NC General Assembly (NCGA):

Various Presenters

✓ Session Update

✓ Clarity Around CBD & Hemp

✓ “Year-Round” Calendar: Trend Making Headlines & Raising Concerns

✓ School Construction Status Report

✓ Other Topics – Suggestions are Welcome

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

 

School Technology Resolution

NCSBA has been hard at work trying to formulate a responsible payment option for the unpaid $730 million that the State still owes to public schools per a 2008 court judgment. The judge ruled that those funds should have been used exclusively for school technology but were instead unconstitutionally diverted by several State agencies to other purposes. For more background on this case, click here.

We would like to thank the 33 school districts (click here to see list) that have already shared and advocated their adopted resolutions, as well as the districts that plan to adopt resolutions at this month’s school board meeting. We encourage each district to consider how these funds could benefit their students. If your district adopted the resolution but you do not see it listed, please email a copy of your resolution to Rebekah Howard at rhoward@ncsba.org. Please let Rebekah know if you need a copy of a sample resolution.

 

K-3 Reading Assessment Update

According to a WRAL media report, DPI and Istation, the new company chosen by DPI to assess the reading skills of North Carolina’s K-3 public school students, filed a joint motion earlier this month for a ruling on the two parties’ October court arguments. Istation’s contract has been on hold for months due to a legal review requested by Istation’s competitor Amplify who was replaced by Istation.

 

State Board of Education Meeting – December 4-5

The State Board of Education met this week to discuss topics including Educator Preparation Programs (EPPs) and high school history course requirements. Data presented at the meeting showed that the percentage of teachers passing licensure exams has been decreasing over the past few years, with the passing rate going from 96.0% in 2014 to 80.2% in 2018. The downward trend became noticeable after a 2016 law allowed teachers to begin working without a continuing professional license, as long as they passed their licensure exam within their third year of teaching. Dr. Tomberlin of DPI made the point that although this downward trend is seen as a problem, it could also be viewed as a better alternative than filling classrooms with substitutes. Click here to view the EPP presentation.

HB 924: Teacher Contract Changes (S.L. 2019-82) establishes the completion of an Economics and Personal Finance (EPF) course as a public high school graduation requirement beginning with the freshman class of 2020-21. Board members were presented the revised history course requirements, which would combine the currently required two American history courses into one course in order to add the EPF course to the graduation requirements. The Board will vote on this revision at the January 2020 meeting. Click here to view the history course revision presentation.

Click here to access all Board materials.

 

 

Candidate filing opened on Monday, December 2. Click here to view a list of all candidates who will appear on 2020 ballots in NC.

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – December 6, 2019
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NCSBA Legislative Update – November 15, 2019

NCSBA Legislative Update – November 15, 2019

This Week at the Legislature

The legislature reconvened on Wednesday at noon with the goal of focusing on redistricting. Although it was stated that lawmakers may take up other issues this week, there was no discussion on school employee pay following the Governor’s veto of SB 354: Strengthening Educators’ Pay Act last Friday, November 8. Both the House and the Senate plant to adjourn today and are scheduled to reconvene on January 14.

Session Laws

The following education k-12 bills have become session law:

To view summaries of these three bills, click here to access our 2019 Legislative Summary. You can also access the summary by going to the NCSBA.org website: click on the green square in the middle of the page labeled “Governmental Relations” and select “8. 2019 Legislative Summary” from the menu on the left side of the page.

Mini Budgets

So far this session, 16 mini budget bills have been signed into session law by the Governor. Over the past two weeks, the Governor signed the following mini budget bills into session law:

The Governor vetoed the following mini budget bills:

 

Public Policy Conference – Advocating for Students

January 23-24

Raleigh, NC

Early bird rate: $250 – After January 3: $325

Click here to register.

  • Transforming an Education Culture – Tips & Tools to Improve Teacher Recruitment, Retention, & Effectiveness
  • How to Maximize Educational Attainment & Economic Alignment
  • Outside the Box Approach to Effective Advocacy
  • Personalized Learning: Hear from a Principal Who Implemented the Program & Eliminated A-F Student Grades
  • What’s Trending at the Legislature

 

State Board of Education Meeting – November 5-7

The State Board of Education met last week for three days at the North Carolina A&T State University Student Center. This month’s meeting consisted of the monthly meeting schedule and votes, as well as the fall planning work sessions. Board members and advisors heard presentations concerning shifting demographics in NC and the US that are changing common perceptions of public-school students, the School Justice Partnership, and how North Edgecombe High School’s principal is striving to address students’ needs with equity. The Board was also presented with the monthly Innovative School District (ISD) update, which included a summary of SB 522: Low-Perf. Schools/Adv. Teaching Roles (S.L. 2019-248) and a list of 69 qualifying schools. Click here to access the presentation.

Click here to access all Board materials.

 

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – November 15, 2019
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NCSBA Legislative Update – November 1, 2019

NCSBA Legislative Update – November 1, 2019

This Week at the Legislature

We are now in the fifth month of the 2019-2020 fiscal year. Halloween has come and gone, and there is still no approved State budget. The budget veto override was included on the Senate calendar each day this week, but Republican Senate leadership did not put it up for a vote.

 

                                                           

With Halloween spirit in the air and witches walking the halls of the legislative building, the House and Senate adjourned on Thursday, October 31…temporarily until November 13, with stated plans to return again on January 14. Since the courts rejected the Congressional district maps this week, legislators plan to use that time to redraw maps (the same judges approved the legislative district maps this week). However, lawmakers will also be able to take up the Governor’s vetoes and other legislation.

 

Teacher Pay

The big headline this week was in the introduction and passage of SB 354: Strengthening Educators’ Pay Act. The bill includes school employee pay raises, but with a twist. Part I of SB 354 reflects compensation for public school employees as written in the vetoed State budget (HB 966), including a 3.9% teacher salary increase over the fiscal biennium. But Part II would provide higher pay increases if there is a budget veto override.

See “Highlights of K-12 Education Bills” below for more details on SB 354.

 

Mini Budgets

So far this session, 12 mini budget bills have been signed into session law by the Governor.

The following seven mini budget bills have been sent to the Governor:

 

Highlights of K-12 Education Bills

SB 354: Strengthening Educators’ Pay Act

  • Presented to the Governor on Friday, November 1
  • Teacher salaries
SB 354 Part I SB 354 Part II

(applies if there is a budget veto override)

Increases average teacher salary by 3.9% over the biennium Increases average teacher salary by 4.4% over the biennium
Gives teachers with 16-20 years of experience a $500 raise for each fiscal year of the biennium Gives teachers with 16-20 years of experience a $500 raise in FY 2019-2020 and a $1,000 raise in FY 2020-2021
Gives teachers with 21-24 years of experience a $1,500 raise in FY 2019-2020 and a $500 raise in FY 2020-2021 Gives teachers with 21-24 years of experience a $1,500 raise in FY 2019-2020 and a $1,000 raise in FY 2020-2021
Gives teachers with 25 or more years of experience a $600 raise in FY 2019-2020 and a $500 raise in FY 2020-2021 Gives teachers with 25 or more years of experience a $600 raise in FY 2019-2020 and a $1000 raise in FY 2020-2021

 

  • Provides a $500 bonus no later than November 30, 2019 for teachers with 25 or more years of experience as of November 1, 2019 – GA intends to continue this bonus in 2020
  • Modifies the definition of a “highly qualified graduate” for those entering the teaching profession in the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium – qualified graduates receive a salary supplement each month
  • Grants small county signing bonuses for teachers who are employees in LEAs that received small county school system supplemental funding in the 2018-2019 fiscal year and are matched on the basis of $1.00 in State funds for every $1.00 in local funds, up to $2,000 in State funds
  • Maintains the base assistant principal pay and supplements – pay is based on the “A” teacher salary schedule plus 19%
  • Central office and noncertified personnel salaries
SB 354 Part I SB 354 Part II

(applies if there is a budget veto override)

Increases central office and noncertified personnel salaries by 1% for FY 2019-2020 GA intends to appropriate an additional 1% pay increase for FY 2020-2021 Increases central office and noncertified personnel salaries by 2% each fiscal year of the biennium
Establishes maximum monthly salary levels for central office employees from State funds Increases maximum monthly salary levels for central office employees from State funds for both years of the biennium
Provides a 0.5% bonus for noncertified public school employees no later than October 31, 2020

 

  • Designates how additional funds will be used if HB 966 becomes law
  • Clarifies that if HB 966 does not become law, then Part I of this bill shall remain in effect – if HB 966 becomes law, certain sections of Part I of this bill and certain sections in HB 966 are repealed

 

HB 377: Teacher Step Act (all sections are consistent with HB 966 unless otherwise noted)

  • Presented to the Governor on Friday, November 1
  • Appropriates funds for principal salary increases for each year of the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium
  • Establishes the 2019-2020 Teacher Monthly Salary Schedule for teachers and instructional support personnel to receive applicable salary step increases
  • Authorizes salary supplements for highly qualified NC teaching graduates entering the teaching profession in the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium
  • Provides principal salary increases for the 2019-2020 fiscal year based on school average daily membership and school growth scores
  • Provides principal bonuses, consistent with HB 966, but changes the application of bonuses to not apply to principals who are no longer employed as a principal or whose last workday is prior to November 1, 2019 (was October 1) and requires the bonus to be paid no later than November 30, 2019 (was October 31)
    • Eliminates the principal double bonus for principals in schools with D or F performance grades
    • The chart below shows the bonus increase for principals in the top 5% and 10%
Statewide Growth Percentage 2019-2020 Bonus 2018-2019 Bonus
Top 5% $15,000 $10,000
Top 10% $10,000 $7,500
Top 15% $5,000 $5,000
Top 20% $2,500 $2,500
Top 50% $1,000 $1,000

 

  • Establishes the Principal Recruitment Supplement Program, which will provide an annual salary supplement of $30,000 for up to 36 months for a principal who is paid on the exceeded growth column of the salary schedule and accepts employment at a low-performing school that is in the bottom 5%
    • The principal remains eligible for the 36 months regardless of future school performance grades or whether the principal continues to be paid based on the exceeded growth column
  • Authorizes assistant principal salary step increases for the 2019-2020 fiscal year based on years of experience
    • Pay is based on the “A” teacher salary schedule, plus 19%
  • Authorizes salary step increases based on years of experience for employees of schools operated by DHHS, DPS, and SBE who are paid on the teacher salary schedule
  • Clarifies that application of salary increases for principals does not apply to persons separated from service due to resignation, dismissal, reduction in force, death, or retirement whose last workday is prior to June 30, 2019
  • Clarifies what sections are repealed if HB 966 becomes law

 

SB 522: Low-Performing Schools/Advanced Teaching Roles (Innovative School District (ISD) bill)

  • Presented to the Governor on Thursday, October 31
  • Defines a qualifying school as a Title I school governed by a LEA in the lowest-performing 5% of school performance grades
  • Expands eligibility from elementary schools to include middle and high schools
    • Carve outs for eligibility include: alternative schools, cooperative innovative high schools, schools that are in their first or second year of operation, and newcomers schools
  • Removes the cap of schools that could be in the ISD (was previously capped at five)
  • Restart schools are now eligible for consideration and selection in the ISD
  • Aligns the selection of innovative schools with those identified by the SBE for comprehensive support and improvement
  • Requires LEAs to annually inform boards of county commissioners on academic progress of schools in the LEA
  • Requires the SBE to transfer the lowest scoring school in the State for the 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 school years to the ISD in the 2021-2022 and 2022-2023 school years respectively
  • Establishes a multi-year process that will transition up to five eligible schools to the ISD in the 2023-2024 school year and annually thereafter
  • Allows LEAs to request that a school under its control be selected to the ISD
  • Requires further study of reforms for assistance to low-performing schools
  • Eliminates the cap on LEAs that can participate in the Advanced Teaching Roles Pilot Program and exempts participating schools from class size requirements

 

SB 199: Child Sex Abuse/Strengthen Laws

  • Presented to the Governor on Friday, November 1
  • Requires each LEA and charter school to adopt and implement a child sexual abuse and sex trafficking training program for school personnel who work directly with students in grades K-12
  • Clarifies that a registered sex offender shall not establish residence within 1,000 feet of a public school under construction, as long as the local board of education has notified the sheriff with jurisdiction of the construction project
    • NC Council of School Attorneys (NCCOSA) was instrumental in the inclusion of this section of the bill

 

Public Policy Conference – Advocating for Students

January 23-24

Raleigh, NC

Early bird rate: $250 – After January 3: $325

Click here to register.

  • Transforming an Education Culture: How to Improve Teacher Recruitment, Retention, Leadership, & Effectiveness
  • Closing the Skills Gap: Tips & Tools to Achieve Educational & Economic Alignment
  • 2020 Election Landscape
  • Outside the Box Approach to Effective Advocacy
  • Eliminating A-F Grades for Students: Hear from a Principal Who Recently Did It
  • What’s Trending at the Legislature

 

School Construction

Senate Leader Phil Berger announced last week that addressing school construction was one of the Senate’s priorities before leaving town on Thursday, October 31. Unfortunately, a school construction bill was not introduced. Please continue to urge your legislators that funding a statewide school construction initiative is a top priority for your district.

Click here for the letter that a coalition of groups, of which NCSBA is a member, sent on October 24 to Governor Cooper and all members of the House and Senate.

 

 

Because of the adjournment of the House and the Senate, NCSBA will not be sending out a Legislative Update next week.

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – November 1, 2019
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NCSBA Legislative Update – October 25, 2019

NCSBA Legislative Update – October 25, 2019

2020 Public Policy Conference
January 23-24
Raleigh, NC
 Advocating for Students
  • Improving Teacher Recruitment, Retention, & Effectiveness
  • Closing the Skills Gap – State Supported, Locally Owned
  • 2020 Election Landscape
  • Essential Steps to Effective Advocacy

Click here to register.

This Week at the Legislature

Teacher Pay

As promised by both House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate Leader Phil Berger, teacher pay was addressed this week, but not in the way that school employees were expecting. HB 377: Teacher Step Act would appropriate funds for salary increases and bonuses for principals and ensure that teachers, instructional support personnel, and assistant principals receive their salary step increases. However, HB 377 does not reflect the higher pay raises for teachers and non-certified personnel that the Speaker addressed in this interview that was included in our October 11th update. For more on HB 377, see “Highlights of K-12 Education Bill” below.

In response to HB 377, many media outlets reported that according to the NC Association of Educators (NCAE), salary step increases are required under State law. We urge you not to repeat this information, as it is not an accurate statement. The law that governs how the State operates when there is no budget clearly delineates that step increases will not be implemented. (Click here to access G.S. 143C-5-4(b)(6).) Additionally, during the Great Recession the legislature recognized years of experience but shifted the pay scale so that teachers did not receive any pay increase based on years of experience. Do teachers deserve a step increase? Absolutely! Are teachers entitled to a step increase under State law? No.

 

Session Schedule

After months of waiting for a State budget and an end to this legislative session, we are seeing a shimmer of light at the end of the tunnel. On Friday afternoon the Senate added a major announcement to its Monday calendar: Pursuant to Senate rule 59.2(b), notice has been given by the Chair of the Committee on Rules and Operations of the Senate to the Senate Minority Leader that HB 966, 2019 Appropriations Act, may be considered by the Senate on Monday, October 28, 2019. The override attempt may or may not happen Monday night, but this is without a doubt a new development.

Senate leader Phil Berger has clearly stated for several weeks that the Senate plans to head home next Thursday, October 31. The House Speaker has followed the Senate’s lead, but his language has not been as strong. It remains unclear whether Berger plans to adjourn next Thursday for a few weeks or until the start of the short session, which is likely to begin in April or May. For the Senate, a lot depends on whether they can override the Governor’s budget veto before they leave. The House, on the other hand, still has legislative redistricting hanging over its head. And then there’s the congressional redistricting trial, which began this week. If teacher pay does not get resolved next week, then that’s another issue that could bring the General Assembly back to Raleigh before next spring. And don’t forget, there’s been talk of having a special session on Medicaid expansion. Stay tuned. We’ll keep you posted on the General Assembly’s comings and goings.

 

Mini Budgets

So far this session, 12 mini budget bills have been signed into session law by the Governor. In addition to HB 377: Teacher Step Act, four other mini budget bills were introduced this week:

The following are two additional mini budget bills that were introduced at the beginning of the month, passed the House and Senate, and have been sent to the Governor:

 

Highlights of K-12 Education Bill

HB 377: Teacher Step Act (all sections are consistent with HB 966 unless otherwise noted)

  • Passed the Senate and sent to the House
  • Appropriates funds for principal salary increases for each year of the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium
  • Establishes the 2019-2020 Teacher Monthly Salary Schedule for teachers and instructional support personnel to receive applicable salary step increases
  • Authorizes salary supplements for highly qualified NC teaching graduates entering the teaching profession in the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium
  • Provides principal salary increases for the 2019-2020 fiscal year based on school average daily membership and school growth scores
  • Provides principal bonuses, consistent with HB 966, but changes the application of bonuses to not apply to principals who are no longer employed as a principal or whose last workday is prior to November 1, 2019 (was October 1) and requires the bonus to be paid no later than November 30, 2019 (was October 31)
    • Eliminates the principal double bonus for principals in schools with D or F performance grades
    • The chart below shows the bonus increase for principals in the top 5% and 10%
Statewide Growth Percentage 2019-2020 Bonus 2018-2019 Bonus
Top 5% $15,000 $10,000
Top 10% $10,000 $7,500
Top 15% $5,000 $5,000
Top 20% $2,500 $2,500
Top 50% $1,000 $1,000

 

  • Establishes the Principal Recruitment Supplement Program, which will provide an annual salary supplement of $30,000 for up to 36 months for a principal who is paid on the exceeded growth column of the salary schedule and accepts employment at a low-performing school that is in the bottom 5%
    • The principal remains eligible for the 36 months regardless of future school performance grades or whether the principal continues to be paid based on the exceeded growth column
  • Authorizes assistant principal salary step increases for the 2019-2020 fiscal year based on years of experience
    • Pay is based on the “A” teacher salary schedule, plus 19%
  • Authorizes salary step increases based on years of experience for employees of schools operated by DHHS, DPS, and SBE who are paid on the teacher salary schedule
  • Clarifies that application of salary increases for principals does not apply to persons separated from service due to resignation, dismissal, reduction in force, death, or retirement whose last workday is prior to June 30, 2019
  • Clarifies what sections are repealed if HB 966 becomes law

 

Cash Abated Bond Proposal

The NC Education Facilities Coalition, of which NCSBA is a member, sent a letter to Governor Cooper, Senator Berger, and Speaker Moore on Thursday, October 24 urging them to pass a school construction package. The letter proposes a funding mechanism dubbed Cash Abated Bond (CAB), which essentially combines the pay-as-you-go method with a statewide bond. We urge you to read the letter (click here) and contact you legislators about the need for a Statewide school construction program.

 

Governor’s Commission on Access to Sound Basic Education – October 14

Commission members met last week to review each work group’s priorities and any changes that had been made based on discussion during the September 9th meeting. Priority topics include finance and resources, teachers, principals, early childhood/“whole child”, and assessments and accountability.

The Commission is now waiting for the public release of the Leandro recommendations report by WestEd. WestEd was chosen by both sides in the Leandro case to be the independent consultant to present proposals on how the State can ensure access to sound basic education for all NC public school students. The Commission’s goal is to have recommendations that are closely aligned with that of WestEd. The WestEd report is predicted to be released by the end of November.

Click here to access all meeting agenda items and attachments.

 

School Safety Grant Program Deadline

The School Safety Grant competition closes Today, October 25, 2019 at 11:59 pm. The program application can be found on the Comprehensive Continuous Improvement Plan (CCIP) grants management system: ccip.schools.nc.gov. To apply, log into the system with your NCID, select your school system, and select the grant application under “Safe Schools.”

Below are tips and resources for the application process.

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – October 25, 2019
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NCSBA Legislative Update – October 11, 2019

NCSBA Legislative Update – October 11, 2019

This Week at the Legislature

The State’s $24 billion budget impasse is now in its fourth month, with no sign of negotiations taking place between Democratic Governor Roy Cooper and the General Assembly’s Republican leadership. The only meaningful budget talks have been between the House and the Senate.

House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate Leader Phil Berger mentioned separately to the media this week that teacher pay is something that they plan to address. The Speaker told a group of reporters that “the education budget is moving along right now.“  Moore added that he’s working on a proposal that would provide teachers and non-certified employees a higher pay increase than what was in the budget that the General Assembly sent to the Governor in June. Since both chambers announced that no bills will be voted on next week, we likely won’t hear more specifics before October 21.

To view the Speaker’s interview that touches on K-12, community college, and university faculty pay, along with several other topics, click here.

 

Also this week, the legislature introduced two more mini budget bills to the mix:

Three other mini budget bills were sent to the Governor this week:

So far this session the Governor has signed nine mini budget bills into session law.

 

School Safety Grant Program Deadline

The 2019-2020 School Safety Grant Program application has been released and can be found on the Comprehensive Continuous Improvement Plan (CCIP) grants management system: ccip.schools.nc.gov. To apply, log into the system with your NCID, select your school system, and select the grant application under “Safe Schools.”

The grant competition closes on October 25, 2019 at 11:59 pm. Below are tips and resources for the application process.

 

New General Assembly Members

Below are the four newest General Assembly members. We encourage our local school board members to reach out and begin networking with their newly appointed legislators.

Senator Rob Bryan, R-Mecklenburg

Appointed: 10/2/19

Replaced: Dan Bishop, R-Mecklenburg

 

Representative Perrin Jones, R-Pitt

Appointed: 9/25/19

Replaced: Greg Murphy, R-Pitt

 

Representative Jake Johnson, R-Polk, Henderson, Transylvania

Appointed: 8/2/19

Replaced: Cody Henson, R-Transylvania

 

Representative Jeffrey McNeely, R-Iredell

Appointed: 7/5/19

Replaced: Rena Turner, R-Iredell

 

Next Week

The Governor’s Commission on Access to Sound Basic Education will hold a conference call meeting on Monday, October 14. Public attendees can listen to the conference call from the EIC room in the NC Department of Transportation building. Click here for additional meeting information.

 

Since both the House and the Senate will not be holding voting sessions next week, NCSBA will not be sending out a weekly Legislative Update on Friday, October 18.

 

 

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6686

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6692

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6677

Rebekah Howard
Governmental Relations Research Specialist
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 747-6688

Rebekah HowardNCSBA Legislative Update – October 11, 2019
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