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2018 A. Craig Phillips NC Superintendent of the Year

2018 A. Craig Phillips NC Superintendent of the Year

Dr. Janet Harmon Mason, Superintendent of Rutherford County Schools, was named the 2018 A. Craig Phillips North Carolina Superintendent of the Year at the NCSBA awards presentation and reception held Tuesday, Nov. 14 at the Joseph S. Koury Convention Center in Greensboro. The award was given jointly by the North Carolina Association of School Administrators (NCASA), North Carolina School Superintendents Association (NCSSA) and the North Carolina School Boards Association (NCSBA). Scholastic sponsored the event and provided $5,000 in recognition of Dr. Mason’s achievements. Mason was nominated for the state honor after being named District VIII’s 2018 North Carolina Regional Superintendent of the Year by the Western Regional Education Service Alliance.

“Dr. Janet Mason’s vision for digital learning and digital leadership has guided her district to the forefront statewide in these areas. She works tirelessly to improve public education for students, staff and her community as a whole, and is well-respected among her peers for her outstanding leadership. She is most deserving of this honor,” said Jack Hoke, Executive Director of NCSSA.

As the 2018 A. Craig Phillips North Carolina Superintendent of the Year, Dr. Mason will compete on the national level for Superintendent of the Year at the American Association of School Administrators’ National Conference on Education, held February 15-17, 2018 in Nashville, TN.

The 2018 North Carolina Regional Superintendents of the Year, all of whom were nominees for this prestigious state award and were recognized as such at the Nov. 14 ceremony, included:

  • Region 1 | Northeast | Dr. Rob Jackson, Edenton-Chowan Public Schools
  • Region 2 | Southeast | Dr. Eric Bracy, Sampson County Schools
  • Region 3 | Central | Dr. Ethan Lenker, Pitt County Schools
  • Region 4 | Sandhills | Mr. Michael Freeman, Anson County Schools
  • Region 5 | Piedmont/Triad | Dr. Travis Reeves, Surry County Schools
  • Region 6 | Southwest | Dr. Stephen Fisher, Cleveland County Schools
  • Region 7 | Northwest | Dr. David Stegall, Newton-Conover City Schools
  • Region 8 | Western | Dr. Janet H. Mason, Rutherford County Schools

 

Ramona Miller2018 A. Craig Phillips NC Superintendent of the Year
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Camden County Board of Education Member Wins Prestigious Award

Camden County Board of Education Member Wins Prestigious Award

Chris Wilson of the Camden County Board of Education is the 2017 recipient of the School Board Member Leadership Award. To receive this esteemed award, which is given by the North Carolina School Boards Association (NCSBA), a board member must be peer-nominated by their local school board.

“This board member has worked diligently to close the achievement gap in his community and throughout the state,” said NCSBA Past President Chuck Francis of Wilson’s commitment during his 15 years on the Camden County board. Wilson is a member of the NC Caucus of Black School Board Members, advocates for progress and innovation, and helped start the nation’s first U.S. Coast Guard Junior Leadership Program in 2006.

The School Board Member Leadership Award honors a school board member for exemplary leadership during the previous school year. In recognition of their outstanding service as board of education members, board members were selected for the honorary All-State School Board. These individuals have made significant contributions to their school systems during their tenure and were peer-nominated for the School Board Member Leadership Award or the Raleigh Dingman Award, which was won by Roberta Scott of Warren County. This year’s All-State Board Members are: Eltha Booth, Beaufort County; Shearra Miller, Cleveland County; Christian Overton, Camden County; Dr. George Truman, Anson County; Barbara Yates-Lockamy, Columbus County; and Bob Wyatt, Rockingham County.

 

Ramona MillerCamden County Board of Education Member Wins Prestigious Award
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Lenoir County Board of Education Wins Leadership Award

Lenoir County Board of Education Wins Leadership Award

The Lenoir County Board of Education is the 2017 recipient of the School Board Leadership Award. This award honors a school board for extraordinary leadership during the 2016-2017 school year. To receive this esteemed award, which is given by the North Carolina School Boards Association (NCSBA), a board must demonstrate excellent governance skills through commitment to the role of the school board.

Lenoir County was recognized during the awards ceremony of the Association’s 48th Annual Conference for Board Member Development in Greensboro on November 14. During comments to ceremony attendees, the board was celebrated for the bold, innovative steps it has taken to lead the school system forward. The board’s commitment to a shared vision helped the system exit low-performing status, increase student proficiency in most schools, and develop its academic options to address the varying needs of students and parents.

 

Ramona MillerLenoir County Board of Education Wins Leadership Award
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Franklin County Commissioners Recognized

Franklin County Commissioners Recognized

NCSBA presented its prestigious County Commissioners of the Year Award to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners.

The group was recognized during the awards ceremony of the Association’s 48th Annual Conference for Board Member Development in Greensboro on November 14. The Franklin County Board of Education touted their county commissioners as a group of men and women dedicated to the success of their community’s students and teachers. Their leadership, support, and cooperation with the board of education have played an important role in increasing student proficiency and achievement and ensuring that vital school improvements are possible.

The County Commissioners of the Year Award is given to a board of county commissioners that is nominated by the local board of education in recognition of their extraordinary efforts.

 

 

Ramona MillerFranklin County Commissioners Recognized
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2017 Delegates Choose New Officers

2017 Delegates Choose New Officers

Delegates at the Association’s  2017 annual conference elected new officers and seven new members to the governing Board of Directors during the delegate meeting of the 48th Annual Conference for Board Member Development. NCSBA’s new president is Minnie Forte-Brown from Durham County; president-elect is Billy Griffin, Jones County; vice president is Brenda Stephens, Orange County; and treasurer is Amy Churchill, Buncombe County. Officers will serve a one-year term.

Members elected to serve a second two-year term on the NCSBA Board of Directors are Sharron Huffman, Wilkes County; Ron Kiviniemi, Transylvania County; Brian Piercy, McDowell County; and Earl Taylor, Onslow County.

Members elected to serve a first two-year term on the Association’s Board of Directors are Mary McCray, Charlotte-Mecklenburg; Dr. Terri Mosley, Surry County; Jennifer Thompson, Cherokee Central School; Steve Van Pelt, Alamance-Burlington.

The Board of Directors establishes the mission and goals for the Association and ensures that NCSBA activities and programs remain focused on these goals. In addition, the officers and directors are the personal communications link between their regions and the Association.

Ramona Miller2017 Delegates Choose New Officers
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NCSBA Legislative Update – June 23, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update – June 23, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update
JUNE 23, 2017

 


**Note that lawmakers are wrapping up the legislative session.  Session may end as soon as next week so this may be one of our last weekly legislative updates.**

BUDGET PASSES

A final compromise budget was made public late Monday night.  It quickly moved through the House and Senate this week and was presented to the Governor late yesterday afternoon.  The budget passed each chamber with veto-proof majorities (77-40 in the House, 39-11 in the Senate), with Republicans unified and a handful of Democrats crossing over to vote in favor.  You can watch the House debate here.  The Governor has 10 days to sign or veto.  If the legislature adjourns before he takes action, he would have 30 days to sign or veto.

For K-12 public schools, the final budget contains pay raises for teachers, a restructuring of the school administrator pay system, an increase in NC Pre-K slots, new lottery funding for school construction, and new opportunities for school employee bonuses.  However, it does not make investments in professional development (which remains zeroed out at the State level) or textbooks (there is an appropriation but it is just to replace a cut which was supposed to go into effect).  These were some areas outlined in the NCSBA legislative agenda as needing additional funding.

There are also several concerning provisions, including Education Savings Accounts, restrictions on transfers between LEA allotments, cuts to Central Office, no retiree health benefits for new hires after 2020, and no funding nor language stating intent to fund K-5 specialty teachers for 2018-19.

NCSBA has put together materials showing all the major funding and policy provisions for the final budget.   Attached please find the budget documents.

ANTI-PENSION SPIKING Bill

SB 117 was a hot topic this week.  The bill was moved on and off the House calendar a few different times throughout the week.  It now sits in the House Education K-12 Committee.  There is expected to be an amendment put forth to remove the retroactive applicability of the language that says the Trustees don’t have to go through rule-making.  This would preserve the favorable superior court ruling in the Cabarrus/Wilkes/Union/Johnston lawsuit as it applies to all the LEAs that have been assessed up to that ruling.

LOCAL OPTION SALES TAX

HB 333, legislation to expand the ability of localities to establish local option sales taxes for public education, remains parked in Senate Rules.  The House passed it a few weeks ago but the Senate has not taken any action.  With lawmakers wrapping up their business for 2017 the window for moving HB 333 this session is closing.  This bill gives localities another tool to help address school construction backlogs and other pressing local education issues.

 

Please contact your Senator(s) and let them know that HB 333 is a priority item for school boards and tell them it is important to pass HB 333 before this session ends!

Other News

Local Education Funding Lawsuits
It appears that lawmakers are not going to take action on the issue of local education funding lawsuits this session.  SB 531, which is the Senate’s bill to eliminate school boards’ local education funding lawsuit authority, remains eligible for the next session since it made crossover.

 


Omnibus Education Bill

HB 155 passed out of committee this week.  A Senate Committee took a bill on another topic and revised it to make several changes to the 115C public education statutes.  The most notable among these changes are:

– A provision that says if a high school has 1,500 students or more then assistant principals may conduct the annual performance evaluation of a teacher, provided that the principal does at least one of the teacher’s first three annual evaluations.

– A provision that delays implementation of the State Board’s recently passed school-based mental health policy.

Charter Schools
The Senate dropped a House proposal to give preferential enrollment treatment to parents who work for an organization that donates land/money/resources to a charter school.  The Senate Education Committee took this provision out of a multi-part charter school bill- HB 800.  The major component of the revised bill now is a provision that makes it easier for charters not identified as low-performing to expand their student population without needing approval from the State Board of Education.  The new threshold (25%) is a little less than what the House originally passed.  HB 800 goes to the Senate floor next week.

3rd Grade Teacher Bonuses
SB 169 passed the House this week and has been sent to the Governor.  This bill gives bonuses to teachers who taught 3rd grade last year and were in the 25% of state or local reading growth scores and then were moved to a different grade this year.  Due to a quirk in the language of the original legislation setting up the 3rd grade reading bonus program, those teachers were initially ineligible.  This bill will ensure that those teachers get the bonus.  A provision in the new State budget ensures that 3rd grade top 25% reading growth score teachers who are moved to a different grade the next year are eligible for the bonuses going forward.

School Staffing Flexibility
SB 448- Professors in the Classroom, unanimously passed the House and is heading to the Governor’s desk.  This bill would provide local boards of education with the flexibility to hire university/college professors to teach core academic subjects in any grade K-12.

Teacher Prep Reform
SB 599, the restructuring of the state’s teacher prep system, was revised by a House Committee this week and is going to the House floor.  The House Education K-12 Committee made a number of changes to the language of the bill but kept the core in tact.  SB 599 is scheduled to be heard on the House floor Monday.   If you want to see the changes that the Committee made to this bill you can click here.

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Richard BosticNCSBA Legislative Update – June 23, 2017
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NCSBA Legislative Update – June 16, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update – June 16, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update
JUNE 16, 2017
                         



ANTI-PENSION SPIKING

The House Pensions and Retirement Committee yesterday took a bill that crossed over from the Senate- SB 117- and rewrote to add a provision designed to undo the recent court ruling on the anti-pension spiking law.  Included in the rewrite of SB 117 is a section that retroactively exempts the Retirement System Board of Trustees from the rule-making process for setting the pension spiking benefit cap factor.  In doing so, this section would undo the trial court ruling in cases filed by the Johnston, Union, Wilkes, and Cabarrus school boards that we reported to you last week.  The ruling said that State officials did not follow proper procedure in developing the formula used to determine the pension-spiking benefit cap factor.

The bill next goes to the House floor.  It has been put on the House calendar for Monday.  If you are concerned about this provision please be sure to contact your House member(s).

SCHOOL BOND

Please make another round of contacts asking House members to move HB 866, the school bond bill.  Even if you have already contacted them please be sure to contact them again.  Attached are a set of talking points on the bond that you can use in discussions.

Budget

Negotiations on the budget are still ongoing, with a few items still to be agreed upon.  Lawmakers remain on pace to have a budget in place by the start of the new fiscal year.  Yesterday Speaker Tim Moore said that today’s (Friday) session is scheduled today to receive the conference report on the budget.  Members would then have two days to review before a vote on Monday and Tuesday.  A Saturday session would be held if needed to provide time for negotiations to conclude.

NCSBA has put together a document that compares all the major funding and policy provisions in each budget pertaining to public schools.

Click here to see the budget provision comparison document.

Click here to see the line-item comparison of all the money provisions.

Click here to see a document on NCSBA’s positions on the budget that was shared with the appropriation chairs.

TEACHER PREP REFORM

The Senate this week debated and approved a restructuring of the state’s teacher preparation system.  SB 599- Excellent Educators for Every Classroom, was approved 35-13, most along party lines.

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Richard BosticNCSBA Legislative Update – June 16, 2017
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NCSBA Legislative Update – June 9, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update – June 9, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update
JUNE 9, 2017

 



BUDGET NEWS

Negotiations began on a budget compromise on Monday after conferees were named by House and Senate leaders.  Talks are still ongoing and are expected to continue into next week.  One of the big hurdles remains the tax plan.  The Senate proposed to cut $1B in taxes over two years.  The House offered a tax cut package that is roughly one-third of the Senate’s.  Despite the differences, Speaker Tim Moore publicly stated that he believes a deal could be in place by July 1.

NCSBA has put together a document that compares all the major funding and policy provisions in each budget pertaining to public schools.  The document illustrates just how different the two budgets are (the provisions that are similar are highlighted in yellow in the document.

Click here to see the budget provision comparison document.

Here are a couple of other documents associated with the budget:

Click here to see the line-item comparison of all the money provisions.

Click here to see a document on NCSBA’s positions on the budget that was shared with the appropriation chairs.

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS

The US Supreme Court this week affirmed a lower court ruling that found almost 30 of North Carolina’s state legislative districts are racially gerrymandered and therefore illegal.  This ensures that state lawmakers will have to redraw state legislative districts.  The only issue now is the deadline by which the new maps have to be drawn.  The Supreme Court’s ruling instructed the lower court to reconsider whether the maps and new elections using the new districts must be done in 2017 or a later date.  State lawmakers have been arguing in court filings that creating new legislative districts AND holding a special election in 2017, as originally ordered by the lower court, is not practical.

Soon after the Supreme Court’s decision, Governor Roy Cooper called for a “special session” to create new legislative districts.  General Assembly leaders responded by declaring the request “unconstitutional,” on the grounds that since a legislative session already is underway and conducting normal business, there is no “extraordinary occasion” that the constitution says is needed to call a special session.  Legislative leaders also noted that there is no need for a special session since the lower court hasn’t yet provided direction as to when to redraw the maps.

ANTI-PENSION SPIKING

A state court has made a key ruling on the anti-spiking law.  The court last week ruled that State officials did not follow proper procedure in developing the formula used to determine when the anti-pension spiking law has been triggered and a school system needs to provide reimbursement.

This ruling came from a series of lawsuits brought by four local school boards- Johnston, Wilkes, Cabarrus, Union- after they were told they owed pension contributions to the State because their superintendent salary arrangements were violating the anti-pension spiking law.  The court ruled that officials should have held a public hearing and solicited public comment before approving the formula that determines when a salary arrangement is “spiking” the pension system.  As a result of this finding, it was ruled that the boards did not have to pay the money requested by the retirement system.

The Treasurer’s office has announced that they intend to appeal the ruling.

**If your LEA has either paid or been assessed under the anti-spiking law you need to consult with your board attorney.**

OTHER LEGISLATIVE NEWS

Guns/School Property

After a lengthy debate the House this week advanced a comprehensive bill to loosen a number of the state’s concealed-carry gun laws.  HB 746 contains some provisions that apply to concealed guns on school property:

– It clarifies that a concealed-carry permit holder may have a firearm at a school-sponsored extracurricular activity if that person is participating, chaperoning, or watching and the activity is occurring at a public place.

– Allows an individual to drive in a locked vehicle on a public road across educational property with a weapon if the individual stays in the locked vehicle and only allows others to enter or exit the car.

– Authorizes a concealed carry permit holder to carry on educational property that also serves as a place of religious worship if the person is on the property outside the operating hours of the school.

The bill passed 64-51, with some Republicans joining all House Democrats to vote against.  If the Governor vetoes the bill there won’t be enough votes in the House to override unless some of the Republicans who opposed switch their votes.

Teacher Prep

SB 599- Excellent Educators for Every Classroom, was approved by the Senate Rules Committee this week.  This is the legislation from Senator Chad Barefoot, R-Wake, that would restructure the state’s teacher prep system to allow for more alternative teacher prep programs and replace lateral-entry with a residency program.  The next step for this bill is the Senate floor.

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Richard BosticNCSBA Legislative Update – June 9, 2017
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NCSBA Legislative Update – June 2, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update – June 2, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update
JUNE 2, 2017

 



House Budget

The House released its salary/benefit budget proposals early this week and then moved its whole budget through the chamber the remainder of the week.  The majority of the budget debate occurred last night as the House voted on floor amendments.  Two votes were required on the full budget package.  The first vote occurred around 10:30 PM, an 82-34 vote to approve.  The House came back after midnight early this morning to vote on another amendment and take a final vote.  Final approval was given by a vote of 80-31.  Some House Democrats crossed over to vote in favor of the budget.

Teacher Salaries

The House package increases teacher salaries on average 3.3% in 2017-18 and 9-9.5% over the biennium.  The average salary increases are roughly the same as the Senate’s package.

School Administrator/Noncertified Pay

– The principal pay schedule is still overhauled in the House budget.

– Whereas the Senate budget linked principal salaries to school growth scores, and provided a series of bonus opportunities, the House continues to link principal salaries to school ADM, with additional salary bumps to those principals with higher levels of Free and Reduced Lunch students.

– The House budget provides for higher salary increases for school administrators and noncertified LEA personnel.

Retirees

– A one-time 1.6% COLA increase is given to retirees.

Attached please find a more detailed review of all the major provisions and line-items in the House budget.

Remember that there are several notable provisions in the Senate budget that the House budget DOES NOT include: Education Savings Accounts, elimination of school board funding lawsuit authority, and a $13 million DPI flexibility reduction.

The Senate and House will now meet in conference to resolve their budget differences and craft a final budget.  Leadership is aiming to have a final compromise budget enacted by mid-June.

 


EDUCATION sales tax FLEXIBILITY

The House PASSED HB 333- Local Option Sales Tax Flexibility.  This is the bill that would take existing statutory authority to implement a local sales tax for public transit and expand it so that counties that want to levy this local sales tax could instead direct the revenue to fund: school construction, teacher supplements, and/or financial support of local community colleges.  The bill passed the House 103-11 and now goes to the Senate.

SCHOOL Bond/State board of education

The State Board of Education yesterday passed a resolution supporting the $1.9 Billion statewide school construction bond.  The resolution came a day after the Board heard a presentation on the challenges facing school districts with school construction financing.  You can read the resolution here.  The school bond bill remains in the Senate.
Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

Richard BosticNCSBA Legislative Update – June 2, 2017
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NCSBA Legislative Update – May 26, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update – May 26, 2017

NCSBA Legislative Update
MAY 26, 2017

 



HOUSE BUDGET STARTS MOVING

Spending subcommittees in the House met yesterday to set non-salary funding and policy provisions for their respective portions of the budget.  Once lawmakers return from Memorial Day weekend, the House Appropriations Committee will take up salaries/benefits packages and make further amendments to the budget.  House leaders plan to have their budget wrapped up by the end of next week.

The House education budget already appears to be very different from the Senate’s.  Aside from salaries/benefits, which will be taken up next week, the notable components of the K-12 public education budget approved by the education appropriations subcommittee are below, along with a comparison of whether the provision is included in the Senate’s budget.

House Budget Provision Included in Senate Budget???
NO FUNDING for specialty teachers in 18-19.  HB 13 contained intent language. Same- NO FUNDING for specialty teachers in 18-19.  HB 13 contained intent language.
Creates a school calendar flexibility pilot for 20 LEAs to start as early as August 10.  Same language as HB 389. No
15-point scale for the A-F grades is made permanent. No
Changes the definition of low-performing school so a school that meets growth is not given that designation.  Same language as HB 826. No
Creates 2 separate A-F grades: one grade for school achievement and one grade for school growth.  Similar language to HB 458. No
Exempts dual immersion classes from the lowered K-3 class sizes. No
Aligns the accountability system with the Every Student Succeeds Act. Yes
Requires LEA employees to have 2 hours of training on Youth Suicide Awareness.  Same language as HB 285. No
Cuts the Central Office Allotment

5.3% ($5 million) in 17-18 and 10.5% ($10 million) in 18-19

Yes but higher cuts

10.5% ($10 million) in 17-18 and 15% ($15 million) in 18-19

Fully funds ADM in both years. Yes (with a reserve for 18-19)
Directs each LEA to report to the General Assembly on whether or not it needs to build additional classrooms to meet the new K-3 class size mandates. No
Establishes 1 test to be administered to Opportunity Scholarship voucher students for comparability purposes. No
Builds automatic $10 million per year increases in Opportunity Scholarship school vouchers into the base budget. Yes
Renames the Achievement School District the Innovative School District. No
Provides that if an LEA creates an Innovation Zone and one of the schools in that zone does not exceed growth in the last 2 of the 5 year period, it can then be taken over by a charter management group. No
Establishes a task force to study revisions to school funding formulas, including possibly using the weighted student formula.  Same language as HB 6. No
Creates a new graduation requirement – at least 1 credit in Arts Education at any point between grades 6-12.  Same language as HB 97. No
Provides for up to 4 private alternative lateral-entry teacher preparation programs.  Same language as HB 634. No
Creates 10 new positions in the State Superintendent of Public Instruction’s Office. Yes but creates 5

Also notable are these Senate budget items that the House budget DOES NOT include: Education Savings Accounts, elimination of school board funding lawsuit authority, and a $13 million DPI flexibility reduction.

Click here for a comparison of the line-item portions of the budgets so far.

EDUCATOR PREPARATION LEGISLATION

A legislative committee this week signed off on a measure to expand the ways individuals can attain a teacher license in North Carolina.  The Senate Education Committee spent multiple meetings over the past two weeks discussing Senate Bill 599- Excellent Educators for Every Classroom, before passing it unanimously Wednesday.

While the 21-page bill has numerous components, at its core it allows for the establishment of different kinds of programs that provide a person a pathway to get a teacher’s license without having to earn a teaching degree from college/university.  These kinds of programs are generally referred to around the country as non-traditional or alternative teacher preparation programs.

Alternative Teacher Prep Programs

Bill sponsor Sen. Chad Barefoot, R-Wake, explained to the committee that “Under the old system, you had to be an IHE, an institution of higher education, to prepare teachers.  What the bill does is it says you no longer have to be that, but you have to meet this set of criteria.”  Senator Barefoot cited an increasing number of alternative teacher preparation programs popping up around the country as well as the growing need for licensed teachers in North Carolina classrooms.

Alternative teacher prep programs would have to meet a baseline set of requirements in order to be eligible to operate.  A Professional Educator Preparation and Standards Commission, made up of teachers and administrators, would be created to recommend all teacher preparation programs (college/university and alternative) to the State Board for approval.

Lateral-Entry Changes

SB 599 would also replace the current system of lateral-entry licensure with a system called “residency licensure.”  While lateral-entry allows a person with a bachelor’s degree to teach in a classroom but requires they wait three years before being eligible for full licensure, a residency allows that same person to teach for just one year prior to becoming eligible for initial license.  The resident would have to be enrolled in a teacher preparation program.

“I think the residency licensure track is going to be a faster, more efficient and more focused preparation for teaching than the current lateral entry system,” Sen. Barefoot said of this provision. “I think, ultimately, students are going to benefit more from it and the people who are engaged in it will benefit more from it.”

You can read the bill by clicking here and you can read a summary of the bill by clicking here.


EDUCATION SALES TAX FLEXIBILITY

HB 333- Local Option Sales Tax Flexibility, giving counties flexibility to convert existing public transit local sales tax authority to public education use passed the House Finance Committee overwhelmingly.  It will likely come up for a vote the next time the House takes up legislation on the floor.


LOW INCOME STUDENTS/ACADEMICALLY GIFTED PLACEMENT

A three-part investigative series by the News and Observer and Charlotte Observer studied the last seven years of student placement into Academically and Intellectually Gifted programs across North Carolina.  The series found that a larger proportion of more affluent students are selected for these classes than low-income students with similar test scores.  If you are interested in reading this series you can find the links below.

Part 1: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/education/article149942987.html

Part 2: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/education/article150366187.html

Part 3: http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/education/article150367607.html

 

FEDERAL EDUCATION BUDGET

The National School Boards Association has released an analysis of the Trump Administration’s 2018 budget for federal education funding.  Click here for the NSBA summary and review.

 

Leanne E. Winner
Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6686 direct dial

Bruce Mildwurf
Associate Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919) 606-3916 mobile

Richard Bostic
Assistant Director of Governmental Relations
N.C. School Boards Association
(919)747-6677 direct dial

 

Richard BosticNCSBA Legislative Update – May 26, 2017
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